Impact of fluorescent lighting on the browning potential of model wine solutions containing organic acids and iron

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Abstract

Model wine solutions containing organic acids, individually or combined, and iron(III), were exposed to light from fluorescent lamps or stored in darkness for four hours. (−)-Epicatechin was then added, and the solutions incubated in darkness for 10 days. Browning was monitored by UV–visible absorption spectrophotometry and UHPLC-DAD. The pre-irradiated solutions containing tartaric acid exhibited increased yellow/brown coloration compared to the dark controls mainly due to reaction of the tartaric acid photodegradation product glyoxylic acid with (−)-epicatechin to form xanthylium cation pigments. In these solutions, browning decreased as the concentrations of organic acids other than tartaric acid increased. Xanthylium cations were also detected in the pre-irradiated malic acid solution. However, in the malic acid, succinic acid, citric acid and lactic acid solutions, any coloration was mainly due to the production of dehydrodiepicatechin A, which was largely independent of prior light exposure, but strongly affected by the organic acid present.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)239-248
Number of pages10
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume243
Early online dateSep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2018

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fluorescent lighting
Wine
Organic acids
Lighting
organic acids and salts
wines
Iron
iron
tartaric acid
Acids
Catechin
Darkness
malic acid
epicatechin
Cations
cations
glyoxylic acid
Light
Fluorescent lamps
color

Cite this

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title = "Impact of fluorescent lighting on the browning potential of model wine solutions containing organic acids and iron",
abstract = "Model wine solutions containing organic acids, individually or combined, and iron(III), were exposed to light from fluorescent lamps or stored in darkness for four hours. (−)-Epicatechin was then added, and the solutions incubated in darkness for 10 days. Browning was monitored by UV–visible absorption spectrophotometry and UHPLC-DAD. The pre-irradiated solutions containing tartaric acid exhibited increased yellow/brown coloration compared to the dark controls mainly due to reaction of the tartaric acid photodegradation product glyoxylic acid with (−)-epicatechin to form xanthylium cation pigments. In these solutions, browning decreased as the concentrations of organic acids other than tartaric acid increased. Xanthylium cations were also detected in the pre-irradiated malic acid solution. However, in the malic acid, succinic acid, citric acid and lactic acid solutions, any coloration was mainly due to the production of dehydrodiepicatechin A, which was largely independent of prior light exposure, but strongly affected by the organic acid present.",
keywords = "Carbonyl compound, Flavan-3-ol, Iron(III) carboxylate, Oxidation, Photochemistry, Polymerization, Xanthylium cation ethyl ester",
author = "Paris Grant-Preece and Celia Barril and Schmidtke, {Leigh M.} and Clark, {Andrew C.}",
note = "Includes bibliographical references.",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.09.093",
language = "English",
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journal = "Journal of Micronutrient Analysis",
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T1 - Impact of fluorescent lighting on the browning potential of model wine solutions containing organic acids and iron

AU - Grant-Preece, Paris

AU - Barril, Celia

AU - Schmidtke, Leigh M.

AU - Clark, Andrew C.

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2018/3/15

Y1 - 2018/3/15

N2 - Model wine solutions containing organic acids, individually or combined, and iron(III), were exposed to light from fluorescent lamps or stored in darkness for four hours. (−)-Epicatechin was then added, and the solutions incubated in darkness for 10 days. Browning was monitored by UV–visible absorption spectrophotometry and UHPLC-DAD. The pre-irradiated solutions containing tartaric acid exhibited increased yellow/brown coloration compared to the dark controls mainly due to reaction of the tartaric acid photodegradation product glyoxylic acid with (−)-epicatechin to form xanthylium cation pigments. In these solutions, browning decreased as the concentrations of organic acids other than tartaric acid increased. Xanthylium cations were also detected in the pre-irradiated malic acid solution. However, in the malic acid, succinic acid, citric acid and lactic acid solutions, any coloration was mainly due to the production of dehydrodiepicatechin A, which was largely independent of prior light exposure, but strongly affected by the organic acid present.

AB - Model wine solutions containing organic acids, individually or combined, and iron(III), were exposed to light from fluorescent lamps or stored in darkness for four hours. (−)-Epicatechin was then added, and the solutions incubated in darkness for 10 days. Browning was monitored by UV–visible absorption spectrophotometry and UHPLC-DAD. The pre-irradiated solutions containing tartaric acid exhibited increased yellow/brown coloration compared to the dark controls mainly due to reaction of the tartaric acid photodegradation product glyoxylic acid with (−)-epicatechin to form xanthylium cation pigments. In these solutions, browning decreased as the concentrations of organic acids other than tartaric acid increased. Xanthylium cations were also detected in the pre-irradiated malic acid solution. However, in the malic acid, succinic acid, citric acid and lactic acid solutions, any coloration was mainly due to the production of dehydrodiepicatechin A, which was largely independent of prior light exposure, but strongly affected by the organic acid present.

KW - Carbonyl compound

KW - Flavan-3-ol

KW - Iron(III) carboxylate

KW - Oxidation

KW - Photochemistry

KW - Polymerization

KW - Xanthylium cation ethyl ester

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