Impact of patient motion on myocardial perfusion SPECT diagnostic integrity: part 2

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Abstract

Objective:Advances in 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals and multiple-detector gantries have the potential to increase the significance of patient motion on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT acquisitions. Methods:An experimental study was used to evaluate the effect of various patient motions on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT data using 522 motion simulations generated from a technically and diagnostically normal dataset. Results:Of studies with induced motion, 21.7% of simulated motion demonstrated motion-induced artifacts. Abrupt motion resulted in artifacts for 52.6% of studies, whereas bounce motion resulted in artifacts in 6.8% of studies. The locations where motion resulted in the most studies with artifacts were at 45° (36.1%) and 75° (32.4%). No statistical difference was demonstrated between single, dual-, and triple-head configurations. Conclusion:Combining these results with those of the clinical evaluation of incidence indicates that patient motion during 99mTc-based myocardial perfusion SPECT studies is a potential source of false-positive findings for coronary artery disease. There is a 7.1% probability that myocardial perfusion SPECT studies performed at the 3 sites investigated will contain a motion-induced artifact. Fully realized, this potential results in decreased test specificity and unfavorable cost and consequence outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-163
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
Volume32
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Perfusion
Artifacts
Radiopharmaceuticals
Coronary Artery Disease
Head
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence

Cite this

@article{2330d56c9c334f93bf4fe8d05a67cf08,
title = "Impact of patient motion on myocardial perfusion SPECT diagnostic integrity: part 2",
abstract = "Objective:Advances in 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals and multiple-detector gantries have the potential to increase the significance of patient motion on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT acquisitions. Methods:An experimental study was used to evaluate the effect of various patient motions on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT data using 522 motion simulations generated from a technically and diagnostically normal dataset. Results:Of studies with induced motion, 21.7{\%} of simulated motion demonstrated motion-induced artifacts. Abrupt motion resulted in artifacts for 52.6{\%} of studies, whereas bounce motion resulted in artifacts in 6.8{\%} of studies. The locations where motion resulted in the most studies with artifacts were at 45° (36.1{\%}) and 75° (32.4{\%}). No statistical difference was demonstrated between single, dual-, and triple-head configurations. Conclusion:Combining these results with those of the clinical evaluation of incidence indicates that patient motion during 99mTc-based myocardial perfusion SPECT studies is a potential source of false-positive findings for coronary artery disease. There is a 7.1{\%} probability that myocardial perfusion SPECT studies performed at the 3 sites investigated will contain a motion-induced artifact. Fully realized, this potential results in decreased test specificity and unfavorable cost and consequence outcomes.",
keywords = "Open access version available",
author = "Janelle Wheat and Geoffrey Currie",
note = "Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology. ISSNs: 0091-4916;",
year = "2004",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "158--163",
journal = "Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology",
issn = "0091-4916",
publisher = "Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Impact of patient motion on myocardial perfusion SPECT diagnostic integrity

T2 - part 2

AU - Wheat, Janelle

AU - Currie, Geoffrey

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology. ISSNs: 0091-4916;

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - Objective:Advances in 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals and multiple-detector gantries have the potential to increase the significance of patient motion on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT acquisitions. Methods:An experimental study was used to evaluate the effect of various patient motions on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT data using 522 motion simulations generated from a technically and diagnostically normal dataset. Results:Of studies with induced motion, 21.7% of simulated motion demonstrated motion-induced artifacts. Abrupt motion resulted in artifacts for 52.6% of studies, whereas bounce motion resulted in artifacts in 6.8% of studies. The locations where motion resulted in the most studies with artifacts were at 45° (36.1%) and 75° (32.4%). No statistical difference was demonstrated between single, dual-, and triple-head configurations. Conclusion:Combining these results with those of the clinical evaluation of incidence indicates that patient motion during 99mTc-based myocardial perfusion SPECT studies is a potential source of false-positive findings for coronary artery disease. There is a 7.1% probability that myocardial perfusion SPECT studies performed at the 3 sites investigated will contain a motion-induced artifact. Fully realized, this potential results in decreased test specificity and unfavorable cost and consequence outcomes.

AB - Objective:Advances in 99mTc-based radiopharmaceuticals and multiple-detector gantries have the potential to increase the significance of patient motion on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT acquisitions. Methods:An experimental study was used to evaluate the effect of various patient motions on the diagnostic integrity of myocardial perfusion SPECT data using 522 motion simulations generated from a technically and diagnostically normal dataset. Results:Of studies with induced motion, 21.7% of simulated motion demonstrated motion-induced artifacts. Abrupt motion resulted in artifacts for 52.6% of studies, whereas bounce motion resulted in artifacts in 6.8% of studies. The locations where motion resulted in the most studies with artifacts were at 45° (36.1%) and 75° (32.4%). No statistical difference was demonstrated between single, dual-, and triple-head configurations. Conclusion:Combining these results with those of the clinical evaluation of incidence indicates that patient motion during 99mTc-based myocardial perfusion SPECT studies is a potential source of false-positive findings for coronary artery disease. There is a 7.1% probability that myocardial perfusion SPECT studies performed at the 3 sites investigated will contain a motion-induced artifact. Fully realized, this potential results in decreased test specificity and unfavorable cost and consequence outcomes.

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