Impacts of naturally acquired protozoa and strongylid nematode infections on growth and faecal attributes in lambs.

Joshua P.A. Sweeny, Ian D. Robertson, Una M. Ryan, Caroline Jacobson, Robert Woodgate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Trichostrongylus spp. detected by PCR were associated with an increased risk of non-pelleted faeces (FCS ? 3.0) for both flocks. Cryptosporidium-positive lambs were 2.8'11.6 times more likely to have non-pelleted faeces and Giardia-positive lambs were 2.4'14.0 times more likely to have non-pelleted faeces compared to lambs negative for each respective parasite. Lambs positive for both Cryptosporidium and Giardia were 2.9'11.8 times more likely to have non-pelleted faeces than lambs positive for only one or neither of these parasites. Mixed internal parasite infections were found to have greater impacts on FCS and BCS than single infections. A higher number of internal parasites detected per lamb was associated with lower BCS and more loose faeces. The relationship between parasite detection and live weight or growth rate were inconsistent for both flocks. Adjusted WEC was correlated with FCS and faecal DM% for one flock only, although little or no correlation was found with live weight and growth rate for both flocks. Cryptosporidium ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium parvum were the most prevalent Cryptosporidium species isolated in the two flocks. Giardia assemblage E was the most commonly isolated genotype assemblage from both flocks, while assemblage A was isolated almost as frequently as assemblage E in the one flock. One flock was a potential source of zoonotic Cryptosporidium and the other flock was a potential source of zoonotic Giardia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)298-308
Number of pages11
JournalVeterinary Parasitology
Volume184
Issue number2-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2012

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