Implementation of environmental flows for intermittent river systems

Adaptive management and stakeholder participation facilitate implementation

John Conallin, Emma Wilson, Josh Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anthropogenic pressure on freshwater ecosystems is increasing, and often leading to unacceptable social-ecological outcomes. This is even more prevalent in intermittent river systems where many are already heavily modified, or human encroachment is increasing. Although adaptive management approaches have the potential to aid in providing the framework to consider the complexities of intermittent river systems and improve utility within the management of these systems, success has been variable. This paper looks at the application of an adaptive management pilot project within an environmental flows program in an intermittent stream (Tuppal Creek) in the Murray Darling Basin, Australia. The program focused on stakeholder involvement, participatory decision-making, and simple monitoring as the basis of an adaptive management approach. The approach found that by building trust and ownership through concentrating on inclusiveness and transparency, partnerships between government agencies and landholders were developed. This facilitated a willingness to accept greater risks and unintended consequences allowing implementation to occur.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)497-505
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Management
Volume61
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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adaptive management
Adaptive systems
river system
stakeholder
Rivers
freshwater ecosystem
transparency
ownership
aid
decision making
Transparency
Ecosystems
Decision making
monitoring
basin
participation
Monitoring
programme

Cite this

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abstract = "Anthropogenic pressure on freshwater ecosystems is increasing, and often leading to unacceptable social-ecological outcomes. This is even more prevalent in intermittent river systems where many are already heavily modified, or human encroachment is increasing. Although adaptive management approaches have the potential to aid in providing the framework to consider the complexities of intermittent river systems and improve utility within the management of these systems, success has been variable. This paper looks at the application of an adaptive management pilot project within an environmental flows program in an intermittent stream (Tuppal Creek) in the Murray Darling Basin, Australia. The program focused on stakeholder involvement, participatory decision-making, and simple monitoring as the basis of an adaptive management approach. The approach found that by building trust and ownership through concentrating on inclusiveness and transparency, partnerships between government agencies and landholders were developed. This facilitated a willingness to accept greater risks and unintended consequences allowing implementation to occur.",
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Implementation of environmental flows for intermittent river systems : Adaptive management and stakeholder participation facilitate implementation . / Conallin, John; Wilson, Emma; Campbell, Josh.

In: Environmental Management, Vol. 61, No. 3, 2018, p. 497-505.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Adaptive management and stakeholder participation facilitate implementation

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AU - Wilson, Emma

AU - Campbell, Josh

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