Implicit theories of the causes of weight gain in adults

Nicole Ware, Mary Dryer

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

This study sought to explore the range of beliefs about weightgain and whether these beliefs varied according to personal weightmanagement history. A questionnaire specifically designed for thestudy was completed by 376 participants (94 males, 282 females;mean age 43.65 years, SD=13.24). Principal component analysisidentified five causal attribution factors which were interpreted asLack-of-Self-Control, Lifestyle-Limitations, Psychological,Biological/Medical, and Modern-Living. The level of endorsementfor these causal attribution factors suggested an acknowledgementof the multiple causes to weight gain. However, the most highlyendorsed factor, Lack-of-Self Control, reflected the'commonsense' view of weight gain being a matter of overeating,under-exercising and lacking in self control. Personal weightmanagement history was found to be associated with variations inbeliefs with the more effort one had applied to weightmanagement; the more highly they endorsed causes both withinand outside of individual control.
Original languageEnglish
Pages2511-2516
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2012
EventCognitive Science Society Annual Conference - Sapporo, Japan, Japan
Duration: 01 Aug 201204 Aug 2012

Conference

ConferenceCognitive Science Society Annual Conference
CountryJapan
Period01/08/1204/08/12

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Causes
Self-control
Causal
Attribution
History
Questionnaire
Lifestyle
Principal Components
Psychological

Cite this

Ware, N., & Dryer, M. (2012). Implicit theories of the causes of weight gain in adults. 2511-2516. Poster session presented at Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference, Japan.
Ware, Nicole ; Dryer, Mary. / Implicit theories of the causes of weight gain in adults. Poster session presented at Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference, Japan.6 p.
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Ware, N & Dryer, M 2012, 'Implicit theories of the causes of weight gain in adults' Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference, Japan, 01/08/12 - 04/08/12, pp. 2511-2516.

Implicit theories of the causes of weight gain in adults. / Ware, Nicole; Dryer, Mary.

2012. 2511-2516 Poster session presented at Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference, Japan.

Research output: Other contribution to conferencePoster

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AB - This study sought to explore the range of beliefs about weightgain and whether these beliefs varied according to personal weightmanagement history. A questionnaire specifically designed for thestudy was completed by 376 participants (94 males, 282 females;mean age 43.65 years, SD=13.24). Principal component analysisidentified five causal attribution factors which were interpreted asLack-of-Self-Control, Lifestyle-Limitations, Psychological,Biological/Medical, and Modern-Living. The level of endorsementfor these causal attribution factors suggested an acknowledgementof the multiple causes to weight gain. However, the most highlyendorsed factor, Lack-of-Self Control, reflected the'commonsense' view of weight gain being a matter of overeating,under-exercising and lacking in self control. Personal weightmanagement history was found to be associated with variations inbeliefs with the more effort one had applied to weightmanagement; the more highly they endorsed causes both withinand outside of individual control.

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Ware N, Dryer M. Implicit theories of the causes of weight gain in adults. 2012. Poster session presented at Cognitive Science Society Annual Conference, Japan.