The link between improved mental health outcomes for Indigenous Australians and relationships: What is the role of mental health nurses?

Kerrie Doyle, Michelle Cleary, Kim Usher, Catherine Hungerford

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cultures of the Indigenous peoples of Australia form an integral part of what it means to be Australian – as Australia's first peoples, they have been the spiritual owners and custodians of the lands upon which their communities have lived for thousands of years, upon which contemporary Australians continue to thrive. The significance of Indigenous cultures to the national psyche, however, is not reflected in the levels of health of Indigenous peoples, which continue to be lower than those of non-Indigenous Australians. This paper considers how self-determination for Indigenous Australians gives rise to re-empowerment; re-gaining a sense of identity; and the re-connecting of people, family(ies), communities, and cultures to improve the levels of health, social indices and bonding capital.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-398
Number of pages2
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

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