Improving consumers' responsiveness to electricity demand management initiatives in regional New South Wales

The potential use of behavioural-based constructs for identifying market segments

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The success of demand management initiatives in influencing household electricity consumption has been variable. The lack of focus on the consumer may be an underlying cause. Despite evidence of differentiation in preferences for demand management programs across households, there have been few attempts to segment households. The purpose of this research was therefore to segment the market to facilitate better targeting of demand management programs. The paper reports on a survey of 1074 households. Using three new behaviourally based constructs for segmentation, the analysis revealed that segments differed in program preferences, energy use and the number of past investment and curtailment behaviours engaged in. The analysis also revealed that respondents from lower and higher socio-demographic levels had low and high efficiency behaviours and corresponding energy use. The variance in preferences across segments indicated the potential benefits of a more targeted approach for encouraging participation in demand management programs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-214
Number of pages34
JournalAustralasian Journal of Regional Studies
Volume19
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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demand management
electricity
market
energy use
electricity consumption
energy
segmentation
targeting
efficiency
participation
cause
demand
programme
household
Electricity demand
Wales
Responsiveness
Demand management
Household
Market segments

Cite this

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title = "Improving consumers' responsiveness to electricity demand management initiatives in regional New South Wales: The potential use of behavioural-based constructs for identifying market segments",
abstract = "The success of demand management initiatives in influencing household electricity consumption has been variable. The lack of focus on the consumer may be an underlying cause. Despite evidence of differentiation in preferences for demand management programs across households, there have been few attempts to segment households. The purpose of this research was therefore to segment the market to facilitate better targeting of demand management programs. The paper reports on a survey of 1074 households. Using three new behaviourally based constructs for segmentation, the analysis revealed that segments differed in program preferences, energy use and the number of past investment and curtailment behaviours engaged in. The analysis also revealed that respondents from lower and higher socio-demographic levels had low and high efficiency behaviours and corresponding energy use. The variance in preferences across segments indicated the potential benefits of a more targeted approach for encouraging participation in demand management programs.",
keywords = "Climate Change, Demand Management, Energy, Segmentation",
author = "Mark Morrison and Jodie Kleinschafer and John Hicks",
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T2 - The potential use of behavioural-based constructs for identifying market segments

AU - Morrison, Mark

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AU - Hicks, John

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Australasian Journal of Regional Studies. ISSNs: 1324-0935;

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AB - The success of demand management initiatives in influencing household electricity consumption has been variable. The lack of focus on the consumer may be an underlying cause. Despite evidence of differentiation in preferences for demand management programs across households, there have been few attempts to segment households. The purpose of this research was therefore to segment the market to facilitate better targeting of demand management programs. The paper reports on a survey of 1074 households. Using three new behaviourally based constructs for segmentation, the analysis revealed that segments differed in program preferences, energy use and the number of past investment and curtailment behaviours engaged in. The analysis also revealed that respondents from lower and higher socio-demographic levels had low and high efficiency behaviours and corresponding energy use. The variance in preferences across segments indicated the potential benefits of a more targeted approach for encouraging participation in demand management programs.

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