In a group, “we’re not just a number”: What we learnt from an accidental hybrid health and well-being group programme for First Nations Australians with diabetes

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Abstract

First Nations peoples in Australia are disproportionately affected by diabetes. We report upon a qualitative evaluation of a healthy lifestyle group program at an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. The program was designed by an Aboriginal Health Worker and took place in a regional community. Yarning interviews of five participants and four facilitators were conducted followed by a collaborative analysis. The group context provided connecting and relationship-building opportunities, allowing participants to feel as though they were seen as an individual. The accidental hybrid approach adopted due to the impact of Covid-19 pandemic lockdown, supported transition of healthy activities into the home context whilst still accessing support and motivation from the group. This paper concluded that the unintentional hybrid program found promising individual and cross-generational health and wellbeing benefits for First Nations families which suggests that intentional hybrid frameworks may show promise in improving First Nations peoples’ health and wellbeing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-196
Number of pages10
JournalAlterNative: an international journal of indigenous peoples
Volume19
Issue number1
Early online dateFeb 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2023

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