In or Out? Understanding How Social and Symbolic Boundaries Influence the Economic Integration of Transnational Migrants in Non‐Metropolitan Economies,

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article uses data from Australia and Northern Ireland to examine migrants’ inclusion in non‐metropolitan economies that have limited experience of migration. These places came to our attention in recent decades when the accelerated arrival of migrants presented challenges and opportunities within these so called New Immigration Destinations. We scrutinise migrants’ entry into, their participation in, and eventual mobility within, the labour market in these places. Contributing to the literature that challenges a linear concept of integration, social and symbolic boundaries are used to explore how migrants are included or excluded from rural and regional labour markets. We show how the state frames legal boundaries of inclusion and exclusion and how those boundaries are influenced and manipulated by a range of social actors, including private sector agents working within agri‐food businesses. We find a misalignment between different scales of social boundaries. At a macro level, migrants may be included in the labour market while in reality they can be excluded through everyday interactions
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-349
Number of pages20
JournalSociologia Ruralis
Volume59
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 08 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

economic integration
migrant
economy
labor market
inclusion
regional labor market
social actor
social integration
macro level
private sector
immigration
exclusion
migration
participation
interaction
experience

Cite this

@article{df99e80b430f448cb9b534641a7f9356,
title = "In or Out? Understanding How Social and Symbolic Boundaries Influence the Economic Integration of Transnational Migrants in Non‐Metropolitan Economies,",
abstract = "This article uses data from Australia and Northern Ireland to examine migrants’ inclusion in non‐metropolitan economies that have limited experience of migration. These places came to our attention in recent decades when the accelerated arrival of migrants presented challenges and opportunities within these so called New Immigration Destinations. We scrutinise migrants’ entry into, their participation in, and eventual mobility within, the labour market in these places. Contributing to the literature that challenges a linear concept of integration, social and symbolic boundaries are used to explore how migrants are included or excluded from rural and regional labour markets. We show how the state frames legal boundaries of inclusion and exclusion and how those boundaries are influenced and manipulated by a range of social actors, including private sector agents working within agri‐food businesses. We find a misalignment between different scales of social boundaries. At a macro level, migrants may be included in the labour market while in reality they can be excluded through everyday interactions",
author = "Branka Krivokapic-Skoko",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "8",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "329--349",
journal = "Sociologia Ruralis",
issn = "0038-0199",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - In or Out? Understanding How Social and Symbolic Boundaries Influence the Economic Integration of Transnational Migrants in Non‐Metropolitan Economies,

AU - Krivokapic-Skoko, Branka

PY - 2019/4/8

Y1 - 2019/4/8

N2 - This article uses data from Australia and Northern Ireland to examine migrants’ inclusion in non‐metropolitan economies that have limited experience of migration. These places came to our attention in recent decades when the accelerated arrival of migrants presented challenges and opportunities within these so called New Immigration Destinations. We scrutinise migrants’ entry into, their participation in, and eventual mobility within, the labour market in these places. Contributing to the literature that challenges a linear concept of integration, social and symbolic boundaries are used to explore how migrants are included or excluded from rural and regional labour markets. We show how the state frames legal boundaries of inclusion and exclusion and how those boundaries are influenced and manipulated by a range of social actors, including private sector agents working within agri‐food businesses. We find a misalignment between different scales of social boundaries. At a macro level, migrants may be included in the labour market while in reality they can be excluded through everyday interactions

AB - This article uses data from Australia and Northern Ireland to examine migrants’ inclusion in non‐metropolitan economies that have limited experience of migration. These places came to our attention in recent decades when the accelerated arrival of migrants presented challenges and opportunities within these so called New Immigration Destinations. We scrutinise migrants’ entry into, their participation in, and eventual mobility within, the labour market in these places. Contributing to the literature that challenges a linear concept of integration, social and symbolic boundaries are used to explore how migrants are included or excluded from rural and regional labour markets. We show how the state frames legal boundaries of inclusion and exclusion and how those boundaries are influenced and manipulated by a range of social actors, including private sector agents working within agri‐food businesses. We find a misalignment between different scales of social boundaries. At a macro level, migrants may be included in the labour market while in reality they can be excluded through everyday interactions

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 329

EP - 349

JO - Sociologia Ruralis

JF - Sociologia Ruralis

SN - 0038-0199

IS - 2

ER -