Incorporating governance influences into social-ecological system models

A case study involving biodiversity conversation

Michael Mitchell, Michael Lockwood, Susan A. Moore, Sarah Clement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Addressing environmental problems requires sophisticated approaches to complexity and uncertainty. Conceptual models are increasingly used to improve understanding of complex system interactions. However, cursory treatment of governance limits their analytical potential. This study included governance considerations in a social-ecological system model of biodiversity conservation in the Tasmanian Midlands (Australia). Effectiveness of engagement processes and conservation programme longevity were identified as critical governance influences. The conceptual representation of this system enabled exploration of how governance influences interact with social drivers (e.g. landholder engagement in conservation practices) to modify the effect of biophysical drivers (e.g. land use) on biodiversity outcomes. Such a methodology provides essential information for identifying and guiding governance related points of intervention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1903-1922
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Environmental Planning and Management
Volume58
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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ecological system
Biodiversity
system model
social system
biodiversity
Conservation
conversation
governance
conservation
land use
Land use
driver
methodology
Large scale systems
environmental impact
uncertainty
interaction
effect
programme

Cite this

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title = "Incorporating governance influences into social-ecological system models: A case study involving biodiversity conversation",
abstract = "Addressing environmental problems requires sophisticated approaches to complexity and uncertainty. Conceptual models are increasingly used to improve understanding of complex system interactions. However, cursory treatment of governance limits their analytical potential. This study included governance considerations in a social-ecological system model of biodiversity conservation in the Tasmanian Midlands (Australia). Effectiveness of engagement processes and conservation programme longevity were identified as critical governance influences. The conceptual representation of this system enabled exploration of how governance influences interact with social drivers (e.g. landholder engagement in conservation practices) to modify the effect of biophysical drivers (e.g. land use) on biodiversity outcomes. Such a methodology provides essential information for identifying and guiding governance related points of intervention.",
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Incorporating governance influences into social-ecological system models : A case study involving biodiversity conversation. / Mitchell, Michael; Lockwood, Michael; Moore, Susan A.; Clement, Sarah.

In: Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Vol. 58, No. 11, 2015, p. 1903-1922.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Incorporating governance influences into social-ecological system models

T2 - A case study involving biodiversity conversation

AU - Mitchell, Michael

AU - Lockwood, Michael

AU - Moore, Susan A.

AU - Clement, Sarah

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

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AB - Addressing environmental problems requires sophisticated approaches to complexity and uncertainty. Conceptual models are increasingly used to improve understanding of complex system interactions. However, cursory treatment of governance limits their analytical potential. This study included governance considerations in a social-ecological system model of biodiversity conservation in the Tasmanian Midlands (Australia). Effectiveness of engagement processes and conservation programme longevity were identified as critical governance influences. The conceptual representation of this system enabled exploration of how governance influences interact with social drivers (e.g. landholder engagement in conservation practices) to modify the effect of biophysical drivers (e.g. land use) on biodiversity outcomes. Such a methodology provides essential information for identifying and guiding governance related points of intervention.

KW - Adaptive governance

KW - Conservation programmeDesign

KW - Landholder engagement

KW - Resilience assessment

KW - Tasmanian Midlands

KW - Tasmanian MidlandsDesign

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