Influence of light exposure, ethanol and copper(II) on the formation of a precursor for xanthylium cations from tartaric acid

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Abstract

The production of xanthylium cation pigments was greatly increased when an aged, tartaric acid buffered, 12% (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution was used in a model white wine system. This suggested the formation of a precursor to the pigments during the ageing of the tartaric acid solution. On examining factors responsible for the generation of tartaric acid oxidation products in wine-like solutions it was observed that on exposure of samples to sunlight, glyoxylic acid, a known precursor to xanthylium cations, was produced. The production of glyoxylic acid was achieved in both the absence and presence of ethanol and copper(II). Hydrogen peroxide was also detected in these solutions. The results were consistent with the presence of glyoxylic acid in the aged tartaric acid buffered, 12% (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution that had frequent aeration and periodic exposure to sunlight throughout its storage. Studies on the role of hydrogen peroxide in the production of glyoxylic acid were also investigated. On the addition of hydrogen peroxide to tartaric acid solutions, with heating at 45°C in darkness, glyoxylic acid was only determined in solutions without ethanol.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64-71
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Journal of Grape and Wine Research
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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tartaric acid
glyoxylic acid
cations
copper
ethanol
hydrogen peroxide
solar radiation
pigments
white wines
aeration
wines
water
oxidation
heat

Cite this

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title = "Influence of light exposure, ethanol and copper(II) on the formation of a precursor for xanthylium cations from tartaric acid",
abstract = "The production of xanthylium cation pigments was greatly increased when an aged, tartaric acid buffered, 12{\%} (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution was used in a model white wine system. This suggested the formation of a precursor to the pigments during the ageing of the tartaric acid solution. On examining factors responsible for the generation of tartaric acid oxidation products in wine-like solutions it was observed that on exposure of samples to sunlight, glyoxylic acid, a known precursor to xanthylium cations, was produced. The production of glyoxylic acid was achieved in both the absence and presence of ethanol and copper(II). Hydrogen peroxide was also detected in these solutions. The results were consistent with the presence of glyoxylic acid in the aged tartaric acid buffered, 12{\%} (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution that had frequent aeration and periodic exposure to sunlight throughout its storage. Studies on the role of hydrogen peroxide in the production of glyoxylic acid were also investigated. On the addition of hydrogen peroxide to tartaric acid solutions, with heating at 45°C in darkness, glyoxylic acid was only determined in solutions without ethanol.",
author = "Andrew Clark and Geoffrey Scollary",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of light exposure, ethanol and copper(II) on the formation of a precursor for xanthylium cations from tartaric acid

AU - Clark, Andrew

AU - Scollary, Geoffrey

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research. ISSNs: 1322-7130;

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - The production of xanthylium cation pigments was greatly increased when an aged, tartaric acid buffered, 12% (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution was used in a model white wine system. This suggested the formation of a precursor to the pigments during the ageing of the tartaric acid solution. On examining factors responsible for the generation of tartaric acid oxidation products in wine-like solutions it was observed that on exposure of samples to sunlight, glyoxylic acid, a known precursor to xanthylium cations, was produced. The production of glyoxylic acid was achieved in both the absence and presence of ethanol and copper(II). Hydrogen peroxide was also detected in these solutions. The results were consistent with the presence of glyoxylic acid in the aged tartaric acid buffered, 12% (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution that had frequent aeration and periodic exposure to sunlight throughout its storage. Studies on the role of hydrogen peroxide in the production of glyoxylic acid were also investigated. On the addition of hydrogen peroxide to tartaric acid solutions, with heating at 45°C in darkness, glyoxylic acid was only determined in solutions without ethanol.

AB - The production of xanthylium cation pigments was greatly increased when an aged, tartaric acid buffered, 12% (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution was used in a model white wine system. This suggested the formation of a precursor to the pigments during the ageing of the tartaric acid solution. On examining factors responsible for the generation of tartaric acid oxidation products in wine-like solutions it was observed that on exposure of samples to sunlight, glyoxylic acid, a known precursor to xanthylium cations, was produced. The production of glyoxylic acid was achieved in both the absence and presence of ethanol and copper(II). Hydrogen peroxide was also detected in these solutions. The results were consistent with the presence of glyoxylic acid in the aged tartaric acid buffered, 12% (v/v) aqueous ethanol solution that had frequent aeration and periodic exposure to sunlight throughout its storage. Studies on the role of hydrogen peroxide in the production of glyoxylic acid were also investigated. On the addition of hydrogen peroxide to tartaric acid solutions, with heating at 45°C in darkness, glyoxylic acid was only determined in solutions without ethanol.

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JO - Australian Journal of Grape and Wine Research

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