Information Gathering in Law-Enforcement: Interview Practice by HUMINT and Criminal Investigators

Jane Goodman-Delahunty, Diane Sivasubramaniam, Thea Gumbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Law enforcement interviews are conducted for multiple purposes, but little research exists on their perceived effectiveness. An online survey examined 73 interviewing practices of 324 intelligence and criminal investigators. Participants reported more commonalities than differences; all preferred a cooperative, information-gathering approach and rated rapport-building as highly effective in securing true and accurate information, although HUMINT practitioners gave more emphasis to the latter. Both groups of practitioners relied on procedural justice approaches of kindness, respect, genuine concern, and addressed basic needs of interviewees to build rapport. They favoured noncoercive techniques to point out testimonial inconsistencies and present evidence to interviewees. HUMINT interviewers were more likely than criminal investigators to conduct interviews in informal, comfortable settings, to establish identities in common with and to become a lifeline to their sources, and to offer them tangible and intangible rewards for cooperation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages0-0
Number of pages1
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
StatePublished - 2020

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Law Enforcement
Research Personnel
Interviews
Social Justice
Intelligence
Reward
Research
Practice (Psychology)
Interviewees
Rapport
Interviewing
Procedural Justice
Inconsistency
Intangibles

Cite this

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Information Gathering in Law-Enforcement : Interview Practice by HUMINT and Criminal Investigators. / Goodman-Delahunty, Jane; Sivasubramaniam, Diane; Gumbert, Thea.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, 2020, p. 0-0.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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