Informing Program Design for Connectivity Conservation in the New South Wales Southern Highlands, Australia

Mark Morrison, Michael Lockwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Connectivity initiatives typically require conservation action on private lands as a complement to public reserve systems, so they are more likely to succeed if underpinned by knowledge of the social factors influencing landholders' participation. Using a combination of social survey and market research techniques, we identify spatially referenced landholder segments. Using a number of behavioral and attitudinal constructs, including three psychographic constructs not previously used for identifying segmentsâ€Â'sense of place, lifestyle motives, and nature valuesâ€Â'we identify three lifestyler and two farmer segments, and show that the characteristics of lifestyler segments are more nuanced than previously thought. Preferences for four corridor connectivity initiatives are found to differ across landholder segments, which indicates the importance using a targeted approach for designing connectivity conservation programs. The results highlight the importance for achieving corridor connectivity of the Blue Collar Lifestyler segment, a lower sociodemographic segment not previously identified in the literature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-87
Number of pages18
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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