Inland recreational fisheries contribute nutritional benefits and economic value but are vulnerable to climate change

Abigail J. Lynch, Holly S. Embke, Elizabeth A. Nyboer, Louisa E. Wood, Andy Thorpe, Sui C. Phang, Daniel F. Viana, Christopher D. Golden, Marco Milardi, Robert Arlinghaus, Claudio Baigun, T. Douglas Beard, Steven J. Cooke, Ian G. Cowx, John D. Koehn, Roman Lyach, Warren Potts, Ashley M. Robertson, Josef Schmidhuber, Olaf L.F. Weyl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Inland recreational fishing is primarily considered a leisure-driven activity in freshwaters, yet its harvest can contribute to food systems. Here we estimate that the harvest from inland recreational fishing equates to just over one-tenth of all reported inland fisheries catch globally. The estimated total consumptive use value of inland recreational fish destined for human consumption may reach US$9.95 billion annually. We identify Austria, Canada, Germany and Slovakia as countries above the third quantile for nutrition, economic value and climate vulnerability. These results have important implications for populations dependent on inland recreational fishing for food. Our findings can inform climate adaptation planning for inland recreational fisheries, particularly those not currently managed as food fisheries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-443
Number of pages11
JournalNature Food
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

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