Integration of entomopathogenic fungi into IPM programs: Studies involving weevils (coleoptera: Curculionoidea) affecting horticultural crops

Kim Khuy Khun, Bree A.L. Wilson, Mark M. Stevens, Ruth K. Huwer, Gavin J. Ash

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
2 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Weevils are significant pests of horticultural crops and are largely managed with insecticides. In response to concerns about negative impacts of synthetic insecticides on humans and the environment, entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) have been developed as an alternative method of control, and as such appear to be “ready-made” components of integrated pest management (IPM) programs. As the success of pest control requires a thorough knowledge of the biology of the pests, this review summarises our current knowledge of weevil biology on nut trees, fruit crops, plant storage roots, and palm trees. In addition, three groups of life cycles are defined based on weevil developmental habitats, and together with information from studies of EPF activity on these groups, we discuss the tactics for integrating EPF into IPM programs. Finally, we highlight the gaps in the research required to optimise the performance of EPF and provide recommendations for the improvement of EPF efficacy for the management of key weevils of horticultural crops.
Original languageEnglish
Article number659
Pages (from-to)1-36
Number of pages36
JournalInsects
Volume11
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Sep 2020

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