Invasion, development, growth and egg laying by Meloidogyne javanica in Brassicaceae crops

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Abstract

Invasion, development and egg laying by Meloidogyne javanica in 11 Brassicaceae and four non-Brassicaceae crop species/subspecies was investigated. At 10 to15 and 15 to 20°C, fodder rape cv. Rangi was invaded less than the good hosts tomato cv. Grosse Lisse and field pea cv. Dun but more than the poor host oat cv. Cooba. With an inoculum of 50 second stage juveniles (J2), invasion of Rangi, and the intermediate host subterranean clover cv. Trikkala, were similarly invaded when inoculated with 50 and 100 J2, cv. Rangi was invaded less than tomato. The intermediate host subterranean clover cv. Trikkala and Rangi were similarly invaded when inoculated with 50 and 100 J2 but cv. Trikkala was less invaded with 200 J2. Oat cv. Cooba was always less invaded than the other hosts. Invasion of 3-week-old seedlings of cv. Rangi and 12 cultivars of seven other Brassicaceae crop species/subspecies were similar. Three weeks after inoculation, more M. javanica had developed to the mature female stage in tomato than in the eight Brassicaceae species/subspecies. Females growing in tomato and field pea were always larger than those in rape cv. Rangi. Females in Rangi were larger but those in oilseed radish cv. Adagio were smaller than in 11 other cultivars of seven Brassicaceae, except in plants grown in winter. Egg masses from four Brassicaceae species contained fewer eggs than egg masses from tomato at 6 weeks after inoculation, but at 7 and 8 weeks only those from fodder rape cv. Korina had consistently fewer than tomato. Results are discussed in relation to host status, glucosinolates and potential use of Brassicaceae for control of Meloidogyne.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-472
Number of pages10
JournalNematology
Volume3
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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