Is idiopathic toe walking really idiopathic? The motor skills and sensory processing abilities associated with idiopathic toe walking gait

Cylie Williams, Paul Tinley, Michael Curtin, Suzanne Wakefield, Sharon Nielsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate any differences between the motor skills and sensory processing abilities of children between the ages of 4 and 8, who do and do not have an idiopathic toe walking gait. Children in each cohort were tested with a number of norm referenced assessments. A total of 60 children participated, 30 within each cohort. Those with an idiopathic toe walking gait were found to have different Sensory Profile quadrant scores (P = .002), poorer performance on the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency (P ≤ .001), a lower vibration perception threshold (P = .001), and poorer performance on the Standing Walking Balance subtest of the Sensory Integration and Praxis Test (P = .047), compared with non–toe walking peers. Although this research does not give a causative factor for toe walking gait, it provides a number of theories as to why this gait may not be idiopathic in nature.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-78
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2014

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Motor Skills
Aptitude
Toes
Gait
Walking
Vibration
Research

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Is idiopathic toe walking really idiopathic? The motor skills and sensory processing abilities associated with idiopathic toe walking gait. / Williams, Cylie; Tinley, Paul; Curtin, Michael; Wakefield, Suzanne; Nielsen, Sharon.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 29, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 71-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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