Is social work really greening?

Exploring the place of sustainability and environment in social work codes of ethics

Wendy Bowles, Heather Boetto, Peter Jones, Jennifer McKinnon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)
170 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article examines the extent to which issues of environmental sustainability are represented in three national social work codes of ethics ' the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia. These national codes are discussed and implications for social work are analysed with a view to strengthening the profession's position regarding environmental sustainability. Findings suggest that national codes do not include concern for environmental sustainability as a core professional concern. The authors make recommendations for developing ethical practice and further argue that the international professional body of social work, the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), should take a fundamental leadership role in advocating for environmental sustainability.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)503-517
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Social Work
Volume61
Issue number4
Early online date2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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social work
moral philosophy
sustainability
federation
social worker
profession
leadership

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title = "Is social work really greening?: Exploring the place of sustainability and environment in social work codes of ethics",
abstract = "This article examines the extent to which issues of environmental sustainability are represented in three national social work codes of ethics ' the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia. These national codes are discussed and implications for social work are analysed with a view to strengthening the profession's position regarding environmental sustainability. Findings suggest that national codes do not include concern for environmental sustainability as a core professional concern. The authors make recommendations for developing ethical practice and further argue that the international professional body of social work, the International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW), should take a fundamental leadership role in advocating for environmental sustainability.",
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Is social work really greening? Exploring the place of sustainability and environment in social work codes of ethics. / Bowles, Wendy; Boetto, Heather; Jones, Peter; McKinnon, Jennifer.

In: International Social Work, Vol. 61, No. 4, 2018, p. 503-517.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Is social work really greening?

T2 - Exploring the place of sustainability and environment in social work codes of ethics

AU - Bowles, Wendy

AU - Boetto, Heather

AU - Jones, Peter

AU - McKinnon, Jennifer

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

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KW - Eco-social work

KW - Environment

KW - Natural environment

KW - Social work ethics

KW - Sustainability

U2 - 10.1177/0020872816651695

DO - 10.1177/0020872816651695

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