Is this the price for integration? Some thoughts on the limited intergenerational achievements of second generation Germans in Australia.

Ingrid Muenstermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is only limited educational and occupational advancement between first and second generation Germans (and Dutch) (aged 25 - 34) in Australia. Second generation Germans (and Dutch) are also not performing as well as their Southern European counterparts, the Greeks and Italians. It is proposed that the convergence to Australian education values of the German second generation was precipitated by the German migrant parents' desire to submerge into a different culture, by a high degree of out-marriages, but also by the general acceptance of second generation Germans by the Australian host society. Some comparison is made to the educational achievements of children of 'guest-workers' in Germany and to children of immigrants in Sweden.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-149
Number of pages15
JournalIntercultural Education
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1997

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