'It's like stickers in your brain': Using the guided inquiry process to support lifelong learning skills in an Australian school library

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

Abstract

The Guided Inquiry Design process (GID) is a model of information seeking behaviour emphasising elements of autonomy and reflection throughout students’ research process and based on Kuhlthau’s (1989a; 2004) Information Search Process (ISP). GID is timely in the Australian context as a way to support the new Australian curriculum emphasising inquiry learning but omitting a practical framework for implementing it. This study sought to investigate the experience of students engaged in two GI research projects in Year 7 History and Geography at an independent girls’ school in an Australian urban area. Analysis of the data indicates rich and diverse interpretations of the GID process across participants. Freddo’s comment “It’s like stickers in your brain,” the title of this paper, highlights the memorability of the stages of the GI process. The girls also noted rewarding responses through their learning of the content and skills and “had fun” in this project.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2016: IASL Conference Proceedings
Subtitle of host publicationA School Library Built for the Digital Age
Place of PublicationAlberta, Canada
PublisherInternational Association of School Librarianship
Pages1-18
Number of pages18
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Event45th International Association of School Librarians' Annual Conference and the International Forum on Research in School Librarianship - Tokyo, Japan, Japan
Duration: 21 Aug 201626 Aug 2016
https://journals.library.ualberta.ca/slw/index.php/iasl/issue/view/890

Conference

Conference45th International Association of School Librarians' Annual Conference and the International Forum on Research in School Librarianship
Abbreviated titleA School Library Built for the Digital Age
Country/TerritoryJapan
Period21/08/1626/08/16
Internet address

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of ''It's like stickers in your brain': Using the guided inquiry process to support lifelong learning skills in an Australian school library'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this