Keeping it in the family: Land use and cultural cohesion in the colonial German settlements of Southern New South Wales, 1860-1914

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Abstract

The Germans who migrated to the Riverina area of Southern NSW in the second half of the nineteenth century provide a useful historic case study to examine how the patterns of intermarriage among an ethnic community persisted and to what degree this is manifested in the selection of land allotments and cohabitation. An examination of parish maps, birth and marriages registers showed that the first locally born clustered spatially and expressed a high degree of endogamy. Endogamy in the second generation forced for marriages to occur further afield. The third locally born generation finally married outside their ethnic boundaries
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-68
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of the Royal Australian Historical Society
Volume100
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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