Keeping 'one step ahead' of invasive species: Using an integrated framework to screen and target species for detailed biosecurity risk assessment

Sunil Kumar Singh, Gavin Ash, Michael Hodda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Predicting which species will become invasive in each country or region before they arrive is necessary to devise and implement measures for minimising the costs of biological invasions. Metaphorically, this is keeping one step ahead of invasive species. A structured and systematic approach for screening large numbers of species and identifying those likely to become invasive is proposed in this paper. The Pest Screening and Targeting (PeST) framework integrates heterogeneous information and data on species biogeography, biotic and abiotic factors to first determine a preliminary risk index, then uses this index to identify species for a second, more detailed, risk evaluation process to provide a final ranking. Using the PeST framework, 97 species of plant-parasitic nematodes were evaluated for their biosecurity risks to Australia. The species identified as greatest risks included both previously unrecognised and currently-recognised species. The former included Heterodera zeae, Meloidogyne graminicola, M. enterolobii, M. chitwoodi and Scutellonema bradys, while the latter included Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, Ditylenchus destructor, Globodera pallida, Heterodera glycines and H. filipjevi. Of the ten criteria used in the PeST framework, emerging pest status, pathogenicity, host range and species biogeography most strongly influenced overall risk. The PeST framework also identified species where research to fill in critical knowledge gaps will be most beneficial (e.g. Globodera tabacum, Heterodera cajani, H. filipjevi, Meloidogyne ethiopica, Pratylenchus fallax and P. sudanensis). Where data were available, the information and associated metadata gathered for the PeST framework can be used to guide biosecurity decision making; determine species which require pre border certification and target sampling at the borders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1069-1086
Number of pages18
JournalBiological Invasions
Volume17
Issue number4
Early online date2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

biosecurity
invasive species
risk assessment
Heterodera zeae
Ditylenchus destructor
Globodera tabacum
Meloidogyne graminicola
biogeography
Scutellonema
Meloidogyne chitwoodi
pests
Cajanus
screening
Heterodera
Pratylenchus
Globodera pallida
Bursaphelenchus xylophilus
Heterodera glycines
plant parasitic nematodes
certification

Cite this

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abstract = "Predicting which species will become invasive in each country or region before they arrive is necessary to devise and implement measures for minimising the costs of biological invasions. Metaphorically, this is keeping one step ahead of invasive species. A structured and systematic approach for screening large numbers of species and identifying those likely to become invasive is proposed in this paper. The Pest Screening and Targeting (PeST) framework integrates heterogeneous information and data on species biogeography, biotic and abiotic factors to first determine a preliminary risk index, then uses this index to identify species for a second, more detailed, risk evaluation process to provide a final ranking. Using the PeST framework, 97 species of plant-parasitic nematodes were evaluated for their biosecurity risks to Australia. The species identified as greatest risks included both previously unrecognised and currently-recognised species. The former included Heterodera zeae, Meloidogyne graminicola, M. enterolobii, M. chitwoodi and Scutellonema bradys, while the latter included Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, Ditylenchus destructor, Globodera pallida, Heterodera glycines and H. filipjevi. Of the ten criteria used in the PeST framework, emerging pest status, pathogenicity, host range and species biogeography most strongly influenced overall risk. The PeST framework also identified species where research to fill in critical knowledge gaps will be most beneficial (e.g. Globodera tabacum, Heterodera cajani, H. filipjevi, Meloidogyne ethiopica, Pratylenchus fallax and P. sudanensis). Where data were available, the information and associated metadata gathered for the PeST framework can be used to guide biosecurity decision making; determine species which require pre border certification and target sampling at the borders.",
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Keeping 'one step ahead' of invasive species : Using an integrated framework to screen and target species for detailed biosecurity risk assessment. / Singh, Sunil Kumar; Ash, Gavin; Hodda, Michael.

In: Biological Invasions, Vol. 17, No. 4, 2015, p. 1069-1086.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Keeping 'one step ahead' of invasive species

T2 - Using an integrated framework to screen and target species for detailed biosecurity risk assessment

AU - Singh, Sunil Kumar

AU - Ash, Gavin

AU - Hodda, Michael

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

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AB - Predicting which species will become invasive in each country or region before they arrive is necessary to devise and implement measures for minimising the costs of biological invasions. Metaphorically, this is keeping one step ahead of invasive species. A structured and systematic approach for screening large numbers of species and identifying those likely to become invasive is proposed in this paper. The Pest Screening and Targeting (PeST) framework integrates heterogeneous information and data on species biogeography, biotic and abiotic factors to first determine a preliminary risk index, then uses this index to identify species for a second, more detailed, risk evaluation process to provide a final ranking. Using the PeST framework, 97 species of plant-parasitic nematodes were evaluated for their biosecurity risks to Australia. The species identified as greatest risks included both previously unrecognised and currently-recognised species. The former included Heterodera zeae, Meloidogyne graminicola, M. enterolobii, M. chitwoodi and Scutellonema bradys, while the latter included Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, Ditylenchus destructor, Globodera pallida, Heterodera glycines and H. filipjevi. Of the ten criteria used in the PeST framework, emerging pest status, pathogenicity, host range and species biogeography most strongly influenced overall risk. The PeST framework also identified species where research to fill in critical knowledge gaps will be most beneficial (e.g. Globodera tabacum, Heterodera cajani, H. filipjevi, Meloidogyne ethiopica, Pratylenchus fallax and P. sudanensis). Where data were available, the information and associated metadata gathered for the PeST framework can be used to guide biosecurity decision making; determine species which require pre border certification and target sampling at the borders.

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