Key findings of an extensive 2010 survey of Sakai use by teaching staff and students at Charles Sturt University

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

    Abstract

    This presentation will discuss key findings of an extensive 2010 survey of Sakai use at CSU by teaching staff and students. Sakai is called "CSU Interact" at Charles Sturt University. Findings from the student survey are based on nearly 4000 responses and is interpreted by modes of study (distance, on-campus, mixed-mode). The findings cover frequency of use of CSU Interact, as well as the frequency of the use of the various tools. It also addresses the expectations among students for the use of the various tools. The presentation relates the overall experience of CSU Interact with regards functionality, availability, support and training received. It describes the preference among students for online learning, face-to-face learning, paper-based and blended learning. Findings from the teaching staff survey are based on 300 responses. The findings cover frequency of use of CSU Interact for teaching, as well as the frequency of the use of the various tools. It also addresses the expectations among staff for the use of the various tools. The presentation describes the nature of online teaching at CSU. The presentation relates the overall experience of CSU Interact with regards functionality, availability and professional development received. It describes the rationale among teaching staff for using CSU Interact and reasons why staff do not wish to use CSU Interact.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication"Engage, Educate, Evolve"
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherTafe NSW
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    EventAuSakai Conference - Northern Institute of TAFE, NSW, Australia
    Duration: 15 Sep 201017 Sep 2010

    Conference

    ConferenceAuSakai Conference
    CountryAustralia
    Period15/09/1017/09/10

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