Kia Hiwa Ra! Being Watchful: The Challenges of Student Support at Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi

Monte Aranga, Carl Mika, Susan Mlcek

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Abstract

Support for indigenous students must be relevant and specific to the community from which the students hail. It may therefore be a decolonizing experience. At Te Whare W'nanga o Awanui'rangi (TWWoA) a necessary but exciting opportunity has arrived to address the pedagogies used in student support to determine whether they are traditional, colonized or a hybrid of both. In this paper, Monte Aranga offers insight into the traditional M'ori forms of vigilance and care which serve as precedents for contemporary learning situations; Carl Mika considers the effects that dominant Western practices of literacy have on the M'ori body and thus on the spiritual facet of being M'ori; and Susan Mlcek discusses the symbolic and pragmatic engagement of deliberate acts of teaching. It is argued that indigenous institutions must always be challenging commonly held notions of knowledge, learning and teaching so that culturally appropriate pedagogies of student support continue to emerge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalMAI Review
Volumeart6
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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Kia Hiwa Ra! Being Watchful : The Challenges of Student Support at Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi. / Aranga, Monte; Mika, Carl; Mlcek, Susan.

In: MAI Review, Vol. art6, No. 1, 2008, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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