Learning to teach without teaching: A mixed methods case study of preservice teachers’ efficacy beliefs and perceptions of an evidence-based creative arts subject

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Abstract

Recognition of the inherent value of the Creative Arts in society seldom extends beyond rhetoric to meaningful action. The powerful ways the Creative Arts are positioned within curriculum documents, for example, stand in contrast to entrenched problems such as poor teacher attitudes, disengaging teaching practices and low status. Initial Teacher Education (ITE) programs and preservice teachers are essential to the long-term improvement of Creative Arts education. Creative Arts in ITE is also an interesting context in which to examine the divide between Subject Matter Knowledge (SMK) and Pedagogical Knowledge (PK) that has influenced both educational research and policy. This paper reports on a mixed methods case study of 24 preservice teachers’ Creative Arts teaching efficacy beliefs and perceptions as they completed an evidence-based, discipline-focussed creative arts subject. The Likert scale efficacy data, collected via the CATEBI-B, modified from the established STEBI-B (Enochs & Riggs, 1990), were analysed via MANOVA with repeated measures and T-tests. These analyses were complemented by thematic analysis of qualitative survey data. Results showed statistically significant increases in participants' personal Creative Arts teaching efficacy upon completion of the subject. The significance of Creative Arts teaching outcome expectancy increases was questionable and the qualitative results were somewhat mixed despite being mostly positive. Implications of these findings and directions for further research in this space are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Article number6
Pages (from-to)90-115
Number of pages25
JournalAustralian Journal of Teacher Education
Volume47
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2022

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