Live tweeting by ambulance services: A growing concern

Aidan Baron, Ruth Townsend

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Despite advances in technology being a driver of paramedic professional development, particularly over the past decade, the introduction of new forms of technology appears to have presented paramedics with some professional challenges. Paramedics, pre-hospital clinicians, and ambulance service providers in both the United Kingdom and Australia, have begun using social media technology to communicate what they do to the general public. Unfortunately some of the material that has been communicated appears to breach professional standards of practice, and therefore has the potential to cause harm to the patient, the individual paramedic, and the paramedic profession more broadly. This article will present the rationale behind why this behaviour is unprofessional, ethically and legally unsound, and why it must cease. We offer a tool that will assist paramedics, and other healthcare professionals, to practise safe and professional social media use in their workplace.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-286
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Paramedic Practice: the clinical monthly for emergency care professionals
Volume9
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Fingerprint

media technology
social media
service provider
workplace
profession
driver
cause

Cite this

@article{5f2a7396128048f2ade77801e929a477,
title = "Live tweeting by ambulance services: A growing concern",
abstract = "Despite advances in technology being a driver of paramedic professional development, particularly over the past decade, the introduction of new forms of technology appears to have presented paramedics with some professional challenges. Paramedics, pre-hospital clinicians, and ambulance service providers in both the United Kingdom and Australia, have begun using social media technology to communicate what they do to the general public. Unfortunately some of the material that has been communicated appears to breach professional standards of practice, and therefore has the potential to cause harm to the patient, the individual paramedic, and the paramedic profession more broadly. This article will present the rationale behind why this behaviour is unprofessional, ethically and legally unsound, and why it must cease. We offer a tool that will assist paramedics, and other healthcare professionals, to practise safe and professional social media use in their workplace.",
keywords = "Social Media, Tweeting, Twitter, Medicolegal, Ethics, Professional",
author = "Aidan Baron and Ruth Townsend",
note = "Includes bibliographical references.",
year = "2017",
month = "7",
doi = "10.12968/jpar.2017.9.7.282",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "282--286",
journal = "Journal of Paramedic Practice: the clinical monthly for emergency care professionals",
issn = "1759-1376",
number = "7",

}

Live tweeting by ambulance services : A growing concern. / Baron, Aidan; Townsend, Ruth.

In: Journal of Paramedic Practice: the clinical monthly for emergency care professionals, Vol. 9, No. 7, 07.2017, p. 282-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Live tweeting by ambulance services

T2 - A growing concern

AU - Baron, Aidan

AU - Townsend, Ruth

N1 - Includes bibliographical references.

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - Despite advances in technology being a driver of paramedic professional development, particularly over the past decade, the introduction of new forms of technology appears to have presented paramedics with some professional challenges. Paramedics, pre-hospital clinicians, and ambulance service providers in both the United Kingdom and Australia, have begun using social media technology to communicate what they do to the general public. Unfortunately some of the material that has been communicated appears to breach professional standards of practice, and therefore has the potential to cause harm to the patient, the individual paramedic, and the paramedic profession more broadly. This article will present the rationale behind why this behaviour is unprofessional, ethically and legally unsound, and why it must cease. We offer a tool that will assist paramedics, and other healthcare professionals, to practise safe and professional social media use in their workplace.

AB - Despite advances in technology being a driver of paramedic professional development, particularly over the past decade, the introduction of new forms of technology appears to have presented paramedics with some professional challenges. Paramedics, pre-hospital clinicians, and ambulance service providers in both the United Kingdom and Australia, have begun using social media technology to communicate what they do to the general public. Unfortunately some of the material that has been communicated appears to breach professional standards of practice, and therefore has the potential to cause harm to the patient, the individual paramedic, and the paramedic profession more broadly. This article will present the rationale behind why this behaviour is unprofessional, ethically and legally unsound, and why it must cease. We offer a tool that will assist paramedics, and other healthcare professionals, to practise safe and professional social media use in their workplace.

KW - Social Media

KW - Tweeting

KW - Twitter

KW - Medicolegal

KW - Ethics

KW - Professional

U2 - 10.12968/jpar.2017.9.7.282

DO - 10.12968/jpar.2017.9.7.282

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 282

EP - 286

JO - Journal of Paramedic Practice: the clinical monthly for emergency care professionals

JF - Journal of Paramedic Practice: the clinical monthly for emergency care professionals

SN - 1759-1376

IS - 7

ER -