Lived experiences of seeking support for rural and remote children with developmental challenges: White paper

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

Current estimates from Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) data suggest that approximately 22% of children in Australia are developmentally challenged on one or more developmental domains as they begin school.

Children in rural and remote areas are more likely than their city-based peers to experience mental health problems, and to be unable to access the health services they need. These difficulties are likely to be compounded by the poorer social determinants of health – such as education, employment and income – frequently experienced by those living in rural and remote communities.

Known difficulties of seeking support for rural and remote children with developmental challenges include: long waiting times for assessment, diagnosis and treatment; a lack of appropriate services in their community; the costs of privately provided services; and of travelling to access those services.

While numbers such as these have been in the public domain for some years, far less visible are the stories of children and their families who make up the numbers. The purpose of this White Paper is to share the lived experiences of families and service providers involved in seeking support for rural and remote children with developmental challenges. The stories provided through these accounts are matched with recommendations for changes to policy and practice that respond to the needs raised.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationBathurst, Australia
PublisherCharles Sturt University
Commissioning bodyRoyal Far West
Number of pages28
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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