Making Sense of Transfer and Adaptation across Differing Contexts

Catherine M. Down

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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    Abstract

    This presentation will look at the findings and conclusions of my PhD research thesis entitled Situated learning, poly-contextual boundary crossing and transfer: Perceptions of practitioners on how competence is transferred across different work contexts. The aim of the research was to understand how people adapt to new learning and work contexts as the change jobs or when their jobs change. The findings suggest that there are four types of activity involved: reconnaissance, enactment, exploration and consolidation and that practitioners move between these different types of activity as part of their structured interaction between the technical, learning, social, physical, emotional and organisational contexts which comprise the workplace. The research also identifies the metacognitive skills and knowledge which enhances this interaction and argues that formal education does not necessarily do enough to ensure that graduates understand the nature of work and workplaces and the survival skills which are required.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationDoing
    Subtitle of host publicationThinking - Activity - Learning, 12th Annual International Conference on Post-compulsory Education and Training
    EditorsCharlie Mckavanagh Jean Searle, Dick Roebuck Dick Roebuck
    Place of PublicationBrisbane, Queensland
    PublisherGriffith University
    Pages116-123
    Number of pages8
    Volume1
    ISBN (Electronic)1875378545
    Publication statusPublished - 2004
    EventAnnual International Conference on Post-compulsory Education and Training - Surfer's Paradise, QLD Australia, Australia
    Duration: 06 Dec 200408 Dec 2004

    Conference

    ConferenceAnnual International Conference on Post-compulsory Education and Training
    CountryAustralia
    Period06/12/0408/12/04

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