MANAGEMENT OF BUNCH ROT COMPLEXES OF GRAPES IN HIGH SUMMER RAINFALL AREAS OF AUSTRALIA

Christopher Steel, Sandra Savocchia, Lindsay Greer, C. Haywood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Bunch rot of grapes results in economic losses particularly inregions where rainfall is common during the ripening period.Frequently a range of bunch rotting fungi can be isolated fromthe one vineyard and from the one bunch. Surveys of a sub-tropicalvineyard in the 2004/5 and 2005/6 growing seasons at variousstages of fruit development revealed seasonal differences in thefungal profile of the reproductive structures which can be attributedto climatic differences from year to year. Despite this, thepredominant bunch rot pathogens were Colletotrichum acutatumand Greeneria uvicola (responsible for ripe rot and bitter rot ofgrapes, respectively) in both years. Botrytis cinerea (commonly associatedwith bunch rot of grapes) was largely absent from thevineyard examined. Other bunch rot pathogens recovered wereAlternaria, Botryosphaeria, Cladosporium and Phomopsis. In fieldtrials fluazinam applied as a spray during the winter dormancywas found to be effective in reducing the overall incidence ofbunch rot at harvest, presumably by limiting inoculation load inthe vineyard. Pyraclostrobin applied at flowering also reducedbunch rot incidence, suggesting that latent flower infections maylead to bunch rot at harvest. Bunch rot incidence at harvest wasfurther reduced by applying strobilurin fungicides post-veraisonduring the ripening period. However, this option is of limited useto grape-growers in Australia because of withholding periods setfor grapes destined for the wine export market. Management ofnon-Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is currently not sustainable inareas of high disease pressure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S2.451-S2.451
JournalJournal of Plant Pathology
Volume90
Issue number2, Supplement
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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grapes
rain
summer
vineyards
incidence
ripening
Diaporthe
Botryosphaeria
pyraclostrobin
wine grapes
Colletotrichum
Cladosporium
Botrytis
pathogens
Botrytis cinerea
fruiting
fungicides
growers
growing season
markets

Cite this

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title = "MANAGEMENT OF BUNCH ROT COMPLEXES OF GRAPES IN HIGH SUMMER RAINFALL AREAS OF AUSTRALIA",
abstract = "Bunch rot of grapes results in economic losses particularly inregions where rainfall is common during the ripening period.Frequently a range of bunch rotting fungi can be isolated fromthe one vineyard and from the one bunch. Surveys of a sub-tropicalvineyard in the 2004/5 and 2005/6 growing seasons at variousstages of fruit development revealed seasonal differences in thefungal profile of the reproductive structures which can be attributedto climatic differences from year to year. Despite this, thepredominant bunch rot pathogens were Colletotrichum acutatumand Greeneria uvicola (responsible for ripe rot and bitter rot ofgrapes, respectively) in both years. Botrytis cinerea (commonly associatedwith bunch rot of grapes) was largely absent from thevineyard examined. Other bunch rot pathogens recovered wereAlternaria, Botryosphaeria, Cladosporium and Phomopsis. In fieldtrials fluazinam applied as a spray during the winter dormancywas found to be effective in reducing the overall incidence ofbunch rot at harvest, presumably by limiting inoculation load inthe vineyard. Pyraclostrobin applied at flowering also reducedbunch rot incidence, suggesting that latent flower infections maylead to bunch rot at harvest. Bunch rot incidence at harvest wasfurther reduced by applying strobilurin fungicides post-veraisonduring the ripening period. However, this option is of limited useto grape-growers in Australia because of withholding periods setfor grapes destined for the wine export market. Management ofnon-Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is currently not sustainable inareas of high disease pressure.",
author = "Christopher Steel and Sandra Savocchia and Lindsay Greer and C. Haywood",
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MANAGEMENT OF BUNCH ROT COMPLEXES OF GRAPES IN HIGH SUMMER RAINFALL AREAS OF AUSTRALIA. / Steel, Christopher; Savocchia, Sandra; Greer, Lindsay; Haywood, C.

In: Journal of Plant Pathology, Vol. 90, No. 2, Supplement, 2008, p. S2.451-S2.451.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - MANAGEMENT OF BUNCH ROT COMPLEXES OF GRAPES IN HIGH SUMMER RAINFALL AREAS OF AUSTRALIA

AU - Steel, Christopher

AU - Savocchia, Sandra

AU - Greer, Lindsay

AU - Haywood, C.

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: Journal title (773t) = Journal of Plant Pathology: rivista di patologia vegetale. ISSNs: 1125-4653;

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N2 - Bunch rot of grapes results in economic losses particularly inregions where rainfall is common during the ripening period.Frequently a range of bunch rotting fungi can be isolated fromthe one vineyard and from the one bunch. Surveys of a sub-tropicalvineyard in the 2004/5 and 2005/6 growing seasons at variousstages of fruit development revealed seasonal differences in thefungal profile of the reproductive structures which can be attributedto climatic differences from year to year. Despite this, thepredominant bunch rot pathogens were Colletotrichum acutatumand Greeneria uvicola (responsible for ripe rot and bitter rot ofgrapes, respectively) in both years. Botrytis cinerea (commonly associatedwith bunch rot of grapes) was largely absent from thevineyard examined. Other bunch rot pathogens recovered wereAlternaria, Botryosphaeria, Cladosporium and Phomopsis. In fieldtrials fluazinam applied as a spray during the winter dormancywas found to be effective in reducing the overall incidence ofbunch rot at harvest, presumably by limiting inoculation load inthe vineyard. Pyraclostrobin applied at flowering also reducedbunch rot incidence, suggesting that latent flower infections maylead to bunch rot at harvest. Bunch rot incidence at harvest wasfurther reduced by applying strobilurin fungicides post-veraisonduring the ripening period. However, this option is of limited useto grape-growers in Australia because of withholding periods setfor grapes destined for the wine export market. Management ofnon-Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is currently not sustainable inareas of high disease pressure.

AB - Bunch rot of grapes results in economic losses particularly inregions where rainfall is common during the ripening period.Frequently a range of bunch rotting fungi can be isolated fromthe one vineyard and from the one bunch. Surveys of a sub-tropicalvineyard in the 2004/5 and 2005/6 growing seasons at variousstages of fruit development revealed seasonal differences in thefungal profile of the reproductive structures which can be attributedto climatic differences from year to year. Despite this, thepredominant bunch rot pathogens were Colletotrichum acutatumand Greeneria uvicola (responsible for ripe rot and bitter rot ofgrapes, respectively) in both years. Botrytis cinerea (commonly associatedwith bunch rot of grapes) was largely absent from thevineyard examined. Other bunch rot pathogens recovered wereAlternaria, Botryosphaeria, Cladosporium and Phomopsis. In fieldtrials fluazinam applied as a spray during the winter dormancywas found to be effective in reducing the overall incidence ofbunch rot at harvest, presumably by limiting inoculation load inthe vineyard. Pyraclostrobin applied at flowering also reducedbunch rot incidence, suggesting that latent flower infections maylead to bunch rot at harvest. Bunch rot incidence at harvest wasfurther reduced by applying strobilurin fungicides post-veraisonduring the ripening period. However, this option is of limited useto grape-growers in Australia because of withholding periods setfor grapes destined for the wine export market. Management ofnon-Botrytis bunch rot of grapes is currently not sustainable inareas of high disease pressure.

M3 - Article

VL - 90

SP - S2.451-S2.451

JO - Journal of Plant Pathology

JF - Journal of Plant Pathology

SN - 0035-6441

IS - 2, Supplement

ER -