Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

Background ' Meat is a good source of beneficial long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA)that have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and mental health disorders.Concentrations of LCn-3PUFA are higher when animals are fed forages compared to grain. Little research hasexamined the effects of producing silage from forage on the amount of omega-3 available for meat production.Objective ' To examine changes in omega-3 levels in forages following ensiling under Australian conditions and toidentify silage production methods that maximise the conservation of omega-3 ('-linolenic acid), to potentiallyincrease the quality and health benefits of meat consumed from animals fed this silage.Design ' Silage will be produced from different forage types. Fatty acids will be measured in different lipidfractions prior to and following ensiling. An estimation of rumen biohydrogenation of omega-3 and omega-6 fattyacids will assess the amount of fatty acid available for incorporation into meat.Outcomes ' Silages have been produced from triticale and lucerne. Techniques are being established to extractindividual lipid fractions from forage and to quantitatively determine fatty acid concentrations. Typically, cerealforage pre-ensiling contains around 2.25% fat (ether extract) and approximately 40-50% of total fatty acids as '-linolenic acid. Studies are continuing to examine concentrations in forage and potential breakdown(biohydrogenation) in the rumen in vitro.Conclusions ' If '-linolenic acid is released as free fatty acid during the ensiling process, less will be available formetabolism to LCn-3PUFA and subsequent incorporation into meat. Initial results will form the basis of a project toexamine the effects of different methods of silage production on LCn-3PUFA concentrations in meat.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia
EditorsMark Wahlqvist
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherHEC Press
PagesS116 (P12)
Volume17
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition - Glenelg, Australia
Duration: 30 Nov 200803 Dec 2008

Conference

ConferenceAsia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition
CountryAustralia
Period30/11/0803/12/08

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meat production
silage
silage making
forage
omega-3 fatty acids
meat
linolenic acid
fatty acids
biohydrogenation
rumen
mental health
triticale
lipids
cardiovascular diseases
free fatty acids
alfalfa
ethers
methodology
extracts
animals

Cite this

Clayton, E., Piltz, J., Zhao, J., & Wynn, P. (2008). Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage. In M. Wahlqvist (Ed.), Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia (Vol. 17, pp. S116 (P12)). Melbourne: HEC Press.
Clayton, Edward ; Piltz, John ; Zhao, J. ; Wynn, Peter. / Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia. editor / Mark Wahlqvist. Vol. 17 Melbourne : HEC Press, 2008. pp. S116 (P12)
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title = "Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage",
abstract = "Background ' Meat is a good source of beneficial long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA)that have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and mental health disorders.Concentrations of LCn-3PUFA are higher when animals are fed forages compared to grain. Little research hasexamined the effects of producing silage from forage on the amount of omega-3 available for meat production.Objective ' To examine changes in omega-3 levels in forages following ensiling under Australian conditions and toidentify silage production methods that maximise the conservation of omega-3 ('-linolenic acid), to potentiallyincrease the quality and health benefits of meat consumed from animals fed this silage.Design ' Silage will be produced from different forage types. Fatty acids will be measured in different lipidfractions prior to and following ensiling. An estimation of rumen biohydrogenation of omega-3 and omega-6 fattyacids will assess the amount of fatty acid available for incorporation into meat.Outcomes ' Silages have been produced from triticale and lucerne. Techniques are being established to extractindividual lipid fractions from forage and to quantitatively determine fatty acid concentrations. Typically, cerealforage pre-ensiling contains around 2.25{\%} fat (ether extract) and approximately 40-50{\%} of total fatty acids as '-linolenic acid. Studies are continuing to examine concentrations in forage and potential breakdown(biohydrogenation) in the rumen in vitro.Conclusions ' If '-linolenic acid is released as free fatty acid during the ensiling process, less will be available formetabolism to LCn-3PUFA and subsequent incorporation into meat. Initial results will form the basis of a project toexamine the effects of different methods of silage production on LCn-3PUFA concentrations in meat.",
keywords = "Open access version available, Omega-3, Quality, Silage",
author = "Edward Clayton and John Piltz and J. Zhao and Peter Wynn",
note = "Imported on 03 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Melbourne: HEC Press, 2008. editor/s (773b) = Mark Wahlqvist; Event dates (773o) = 30 Nov - 3 Dec 2008; Parent title (773t) = Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. ISSNs: 0964-7058;",
year = "2008",
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volume = "17",
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editor = "Mark Wahlqvist",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia",
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Clayton, E, Piltz, J, Zhao, J & Wynn, P 2008, Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage. in M Wahlqvist (ed.), Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia. vol. 17, HEC Press, Melbourne, pp. S116 (P12), Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Australia, 30/11/08.

Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage. / Clayton, Edward; Piltz, John; Zhao, J.; Wynn, Peter.

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia. ed. / Mark Wahlqvist. Vol. 17 Melbourne : HEC Press, 2008. p. S116 (P12).

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

TY - GEN

T1 - Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage

AU - Clayton, Edward

AU - Piltz, John

AU - Zhao, J.

AU - Wynn, Peter

N1 - Imported on 03 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = Melbourne: HEC Press, 2008. editor/s (773b) = Mark Wahlqvist; Event dates (773o) = 30 Nov - 3 Dec 2008; Parent title (773t) = Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition. ISSNs: 0964-7058;

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Background ' Meat is a good source of beneficial long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA)that have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and mental health disorders.Concentrations of LCn-3PUFA are higher when animals are fed forages compared to grain. Little research hasexamined the effects of producing silage from forage on the amount of omega-3 available for meat production.Objective ' To examine changes in omega-3 levels in forages following ensiling under Australian conditions and toidentify silage production methods that maximise the conservation of omega-3 ('-linolenic acid), to potentiallyincrease the quality and health benefits of meat consumed from animals fed this silage.Design ' Silage will be produced from different forage types. Fatty acids will be measured in different lipidfractions prior to and following ensiling. An estimation of rumen biohydrogenation of omega-3 and omega-6 fattyacids will assess the amount of fatty acid available for incorporation into meat.Outcomes ' Silages have been produced from triticale and lucerne. Techniques are being established to extractindividual lipid fractions from forage and to quantitatively determine fatty acid concentrations. Typically, cerealforage pre-ensiling contains around 2.25% fat (ether extract) and approximately 40-50% of total fatty acids as '-linolenic acid. Studies are continuing to examine concentrations in forage and potential breakdown(biohydrogenation) in the rumen in vitro.Conclusions ' If '-linolenic acid is released as free fatty acid during the ensiling process, less will be available formetabolism to LCn-3PUFA and subsequent incorporation into meat. Initial results will form the basis of a project toexamine the effects of different methods of silage production on LCn-3PUFA concentrations in meat.

AB - Background ' Meat is a good source of beneficial long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCn-3PUFA)that have several health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease, and mental health disorders.Concentrations of LCn-3PUFA are higher when animals are fed forages compared to grain. Little research hasexamined the effects of producing silage from forage on the amount of omega-3 available for meat production.Objective ' To examine changes in omega-3 levels in forages following ensiling under Australian conditions and toidentify silage production methods that maximise the conservation of omega-3 ('-linolenic acid), to potentiallyincrease the quality and health benefits of meat consumed from animals fed this silage.Design ' Silage will be produced from different forage types. Fatty acids will be measured in different lipidfractions prior to and following ensiling. An estimation of rumen biohydrogenation of omega-3 and omega-6 fattyacids will assess the amount of fatty acid available for incorporation into meat.Outcomes ' Silages have been produced from triticale and lucerne. Techniques are being established to extractindividual lipid fractions from forage and to quantitatively determine fatty acid concentrations. Typically, cerealforage pre-ensiling contains around 2.25% fat (ether extract) and approximately 40-50% of total fatty acids as '-linolenic acid. Studies are continuing to examine concentrations in forage and potential breakdown(biohydrogenation) in the rumen in vitro.Conclusions ' If '-linolenic acid is released as free fatty acid during the ensiling process, less will be available formetabolism to LCn-3PUFA and subsequent incorporation into meat. Initial results will form the basis of a project toexamine the effects of different methods of silage production on LCn-3PUFA concentrations in meat.

KW - Open access version available

KW - Omega-3

KW - Quality

KW - Silage

M3 - Conference paper

VL - 17

SP - S116 (P12)

BT - Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia

A2 - Wahlqvist, Mark

PB - HEC Press

CY - Melbourne

ER -

Clayton E, Piltz J, Zhao J, Wynn P. Maximising omega-3 available for meat through production of high quality silage. In Wahlqvist M, editor, Proceedings of the Nutrition Society of Australia. Vol. 17. Melbourne: HEC Press. 2008. p. S116 (P12)