Maximising utility does not promote survival

Daniel Cohen, Lauren Saling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We argue that maximising utility does not promote survival. Thus, there is no reason to expect people to modulate effort according to a task's opportunity costs. There is also no reason why our evaluation of the marginal opportunity costs of tasks should predictably rise with repetition. Thus, the opportunity cost model cannot explain why tasks typically become harder over time.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)685-685
Number of pages1
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume36
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

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Costs and Cost Analysis

Grant Number

  • DP110101810

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Cohen, Daniel ; Saling, Lauren. / Maximising utility does not promote survival. In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 2013 ; Vol. 36, No. 6. pp. 685-685.
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Maximising utility does not promote survival. / Cohen, Daniel; Saling, Lauren.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 6, 12.2013, p. 685-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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