May You Live Normally Ever After!' ” Popular Film as Pedagogy: Youth, Subjectivity and Australian Cinema

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

609 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This thesis is part of a move to rethink the normalising subjectivating processes that constitute the youth' subject. Through a conceptualisation of popular film as pedagogy and feminist and post-structuralist theories on subjectivity, popular film culture is considered as being profoundly geared towards the practices of subject formation and (self-)governmentality. As a context where we learn about the self, our culture and our place within it, popular film is understood as a profoundly pedagogical space and complex set of relationships where subjectivities are made and remade. Far from a simple act of transmission, film's knowledges and forms of address meet its audience but misfire' due to the indeterminate and unpredictable encounters between film/makers, audiences and cultural politics.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Green, Bill, Co-Supervisor
  • Reid, Jo-Anne, Co-Supervisor
  • Saltmarsh, Sue, Co-Supervisor
  • Parkes, Robert, Co-Supervisor
Award date01 Mar 2011
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

cinema
subjectivity
governmentality
politics

Cite this

@phdthesis{0104ff8d19d04e16a1fa3c18a02b4fa6,
title = "May You Live Normally Ever After!' ” Popular Film as Pedagogy: Youth, Subjectivity and Australian Cinema",
abstract = "This thesis is part of a move to rethink the normalising subjectivating processes that constitute the youth' subject. Through a conceptualisation of popular film as pedagogy and feminist and post-structuralist theories on subjectivity, popular film culture is considered as being profoundly geared towards the practices of subject formation and (self-)governmentality. As a context where we learn about the self, our culture and our place within it, popular film is understood as a profoundly pedagogical space and complex set of relationships where subjectivities are made and remade. Far from a simple act of transmission, film's knowledges and forms of address meet its audience but misfire' due to the indeterminate and unpredictable encounters between film/makers, audiences and cultural politics.",
author = "Kristina Gottschall",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
publisher = "Charles Sturt University",
address = "Australia",
school = "Charles Sturt University",

}

May You Live Normally Ever After!' ” Popular Film as Pedagogy : Youth, Subjectivity and Australian Cinema. / Gottschall, Kristina.

Australia : Charles Sturt University, 2011. 363 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - May You Live Normally Ever After!' ” Popular Film as Pedagogy

T2 - Youth, Subjectivity and Australian Cinema

AU - Gottschall, Kristina

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - This thesis is part of a move to rethink the normalising subjectivating processes that constitute the youth' subject. Through a conceptualisation of popular film as pedagogy and feminist and post-structuralist theories on subjectivity, popular film culture is considered as being profoundly geared towards the practices of subject formation and (self-)governmentality. As a context where we learn about the self, our culture and our place within it, popular film is understood as a profoundly pedagogical space and complex set of relationships where subjectivities are made and remade. Far from a simple act of transmission, film's knowledges and forms of address meet its audience but misfire' due to the indeterminate and unpredictable encounters between film/makers, audiences and cultural politics.

AB - This thesis is part of a move to rethink the normalising subjectivating processes that constitute the youth' subject. Through a conceptualisation of popular film as pedagogy and feminist and post-structuralist theories on subjectivity, popular film culture is considered as being profoundly geared towards the practices of subject formation and (self-)governmentality. As a context where we learn about the self, our culture and our place within it, popular film is understood as a profoundly pedagogical space and complex set of relationships where subjectivities are made and remade. Far from a simple act of transmission, film's knowledges and forms of address meet its audience but misfire' due to the indeterminate and unpredictable encounters between film/makers, audiences and cultural politics.

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

PB - Charles Sturt University

CY - Australia

ER -