Measuring spirituality as personal belief in supernatural forces: Is the character strength inventory-spirituality subscale a brief, reliable and valid measure?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Critical evaluations of commonly used spirituality measures find many wanting' with most lacking the properties required of scientific measures. Common deficiencies include using non-representative development samples, a failure to satisfy normality assumptions, and the confounding of related yet-distinct constructs (e.g. religiosity, wellbeing, civility, prosociality, virtues, etc). The current paper utilizes two studies to examine the psychometric properties of the 7-item Character Strength Inventory-Spirituality (CSI-Spirit; Isaacowitz, Seligman and Valiant 2003). Factor analytic investigations (exploratory and confirmatory) suggest that six items reliably (Cronbach's ? > .70) capture a single latent construct that accounts for around 45% of the variance in responses. This truncated CSI-Spirit appears normally distributed and uni-dimensional. Item difficulty (as reflected by mean scores on items) varies and total scores converge meaningfully with religious affiliation and measures of religiosity, spirituality, paranormal beliefs, wellbeing, agreeableness and conscientiousness. In summary, the CSI-Spirit appears statistically robust and its brevity makes it ideal for individual assessment (in psychological practice) and large scale socioepidemiological research purposes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)211-222
Number of pages12
JournalImplicit Religion
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Measuring spirituality as personal belief in supernatural forces: Is the character strength inventory-spirituality subscale a brief, reliable and valid measure?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this