Metal ion speciation: Understanding its role in wine development and generating a tool to minimise wine spoilage

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Abstract

Iron and/or copper can influence the rate of oxidation reactions and accumulation of reductive flavour compounds in wine. This project investigated the main binding agents for these metals and assessed how binding impacted the metals’ mediation of oxidative and reductive development. The results showed that copper mainly existed in a sulfide-bound form, but the non-sulfide bound form was more efficient for mediating oxidation reactions when ascorbic acid was present. The non-sulfide bound form of copper could also readily sequester sulfide from precursors during reductive development. Unlike copper, iron binding in wine was not dominated by a single binding agent and had minimal influence on oxidation in the presence of ascorbic acid. A colorimetric method was developed to allow colorimetric determination of copper concentration in wine.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationWagga Wagga, NSW
PublisherCharles Sturt University
Commissioning bodyAustralian Grape and Wine Authority trading as Wine Australia
Number of pages93
Publication statusPublished - 28 Feb 2018

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Spoilage
Wine
Metal ions
Copper
Sulfides
Oxidation
Ascorbic Acid
Flavor compounds
Iron
Metals

Cite this

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title = "Metal ion speciation: Understanding its role in wine development and generating a tool to minimise wine spoilage",
abstract = "Iron and/or copper can influence the rate of oxidation reactions and accumulation of reductive flavour compounds in wine. This project investigated the main binding agents for these metals and assessed how binding impacted the metals’ mediation of oxidative and reductive development. The results showed that copper mainly existed in a sulfide-bound form, but the non-sulfide bound form was more efficient for mediating oxidation reactions when ascorbic acid was present. The non-sulfide bound form of copper could also readily sequester sulfide from precursors during reductive development. Unlike copper, iron binding in wine was not dominated by a single binding agent and had minimal influence on oxidation in the presence of ascorbic acid. A colorimetric method was developed to allow colorimetric determination of copper concentration in wine.",
author = "Andrew Clark and Nick Kodoudakis and Celia Barril and Leigh Schmidtke and Geoffrey Scollary",
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language = "English",
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T2 - Understanding its role in wine development and generating a tool to minimise wine spoilage

AU - Clark, Andrew

AU - Kodoudakis, Nick

AU - Barril, Celia

AU - Schmidtke, Leigh

AU - Scollary, Geoffrey

PY - 2018/2/28

Y1 - 2018/2/28

N2 - Iron and/or copper can influence the rate of oxidation reactions and accumulation of reductive flavour compounds in wine. This project investigated the main binding agents for these metals and assessed how binding impacted the metals’ mediation of oxidative and reductive development. The results showed that copper mainly existed in a sulfide-bound form, but the non-sulfide bound form was more efficient for mediating oxidation reactions when ascorbic acid was present. The non-sulfide bound form of copper could also readily sequester sulfide from precursors during reductive development. Unlike copper, iron binding in wine was not dominated by a single binding agent and had minimal influence on oxidation in the presence of ascorbic acid. A colorimetric method was developed to allow colorimetric determination of copper concentration in wine.

AB - Iron and/or copper can influence the rate of oxidation reactions and accumulation of reductive flavour compounds in wine. This project investigated the main binding agents for these metals and assessed how binding impacted the metals’ mediation of oxidative and reductive development. The results showed that copper mainly existed in a sulfide-bound form, but the non-sulfide bound form was more efficient for mediating oxidation reactions when ascorbic acid was present. The non-sulfide bound form of copper could also readily sequester sulfide from precursors during reductive development. Unlike copper, iron binding in wine was not dominated by a single binding agent and had minimal influence on oxidation in the presence of ascorbic acid. A colorimetric method was developed to allow colorimetric determination of copper concentration in wine.

M3 - Commissioned report

BT - Metal ion speciation

PB - Charles Sturt University

CY - Wagga Wagga, NSW

ER -