Migration and Rudd's apology: Whose voices are heard and what do they mean for the Christian community?

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

While I am a resident of Australia, and have been all my life, I actually live in many lands. When my ancestors arrived in this land, in the year that the colonists designated 1839 AD, they continued the invasion of the land of the Kamilaroi. Unknowingly and unwittingly I continued the same occupation. I have since lived in other lands—for example, Wik, Larrakia, Waradjiri, Ngunwal—and now live on the land of the Awabakal peoples. Some of this chapter emerged in a writing workshop held on Darug land.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIndigenous Australia and the unfinished business of theology
Subtitle of host publicationCross-cultural engagement
EditorsJione Havea
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Chapter8
Pages97-111
Number of pages15
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9781137426673
ISBN (Print)9781137426666, 9781349490899
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Publication series

Name Postcolonialism and eligions

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