Migratory fishes in Myanmar rivers and wetlands

Challenges for sustainable development between irrigation water control infrastructure and sustainable inland capture fisheries

John Conallin, L.J. Baumgartner, Zau Lunn, Michael Akester, Nyunt Win, Nyi Nyi Tun, Nyunt Maung Maung Moe, Aye Myint Swe, Nyein Chan, Ian Cowx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Irrigated agriculture and maintaining inland capture fisheries are both essential for food and nutrition security in Myanmar. However, irrigated agriculture through water control infrastructure, such as sluices or barrages, weirs and regulators, creates physical barriers that block migration routes of important fish species. Blocking of fish migration routes, leading to a degradation of inland capture fisheries, will undermine Myanmar's efforts to develop sustainably and meet the sustainable development goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 2 (Zero Hunger), and the sustainability targets within the national Myanmar Sustainable Development Plans, as well as its Agricultural Development Strategy and Investment Plan. Despite the ambitious international and national targets, there is no explicit policy or legislation and no examples of where fish have been considered in the development or operation of irrigation infrastructure in Myanmar. Solutions are needed that provide opportunities to achieve multi-objective outcomes within irrigation infrastructure and water use. This can be achieved by increasing cross-sectoral collaboration in irrigation projects, improving capacity, increasing research within country by experts and providing technical solutions to aid in better management and mitigation options. This paper explores the various components of policy and governance, institutional and educational capacity and technical and management-based practices needed to plan and integrate better migratory fish and technical needs within irrigated agricultural infrastructure in Myanmar.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberMF19180
JournalMarine and Freshwater Research
Volume9
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 30 Jul 2019

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Myanmar
Fisheries
Wetlands
Conservation of Natural Resources
sustainable development
Rivers
infrastructure
irrigation water
Fishes
wetlands
fishery
wetland
fisheries
irrigation
migration route
rivers
Agriculture
Water
fish
river

Cite this

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title = "Migratory fishes in Myanmar rivers and wetlands: Challenges for sustainable development between irrigation water control infrastructure and sustainable inland capture fisheries",
abstract = "Irrigated agriculture and maintaining inland capture fisheries are both essential for food and nutrition security in Myanmar. However, irrigated agriculture through water control infrastructure, such as sluices or barrages, weirs and regulators, creates physical barriers that block migration routes of important fish species. Blocking of fish migration routes, leading to a degradation of inland capture fisheries, will undermine Myanmar's efforts to develop sustainably and meet the sustainable development goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 2 (Zero Hunger), and the sustainability targets within the national Myanmar Sustainable Development Plans, as well as its Agricultural Development Strategy and Investment Plan. Despite the ambitious international and national targets, there is no explicit policy or legislation and no examples of where fish have been considered in the development or operation of irrigation infrastructure in Myanmar. Solutions are needed that provide opportunities to achieve multi-objective outcomes within irrigation infrastructure and water use. This can be achieved by increasing cross-sectoral collaboration in irrigation projects, improving capacity, increasing research within country by experts and providing technical solutions to aid in better management and mitigation options. This paper explores the various components of policy and governance, institutional and educational capacity and technical and management-based practices needed to plan and integrate better migratory fish and technical needs within irrigated agricultural infrastructure in Myanmar.",
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Migratory fishes in Myanmar rivers and wetlands : Challenges for sustainable development between irrigation water control infrastructure and sustainable inland capture fisheries. / Conallin, John; Baumgartner, L.J.; Lunn, Zau; Akester, Michael; Win, Nyunt; Tun, Nyi Nyi; Maung Maung Moe, Nyunt; Myint Swe, Aye; Chan, Nyein; Cowx, Ian.

In: Marine and Freshwater Research, Vol. 9, No. 8, MF19180, 30.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Challenges for sustainable development between irrigation water control infrastructure and sustainable inland capture fisheries

AU - Conallin, John

AU - Baumgartner, L.J.

AU - Lunn, Zau

AU - Akester, Michael

AU - Win, Nyunt

AU - Tun, Nyi Nyi

AU - Maung Maung Moe, Nyunt

AU - Myint Swe, Aye

AU - Chan, Nyein

AU - Cowx, Ian

PY - 2019/7/30

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