Modelling the long-term impact on herder incomes and environmental services in an uncertain world

Karl Behrendt, David Kemp, Udval Gombosuren, Gantuya Jargalsaihan, Han Guodong, Zhiguo Li, Li Ping, Lkhagvadorj Dorjburegdaa

    Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paperpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Environmental, market and political influences affect herders’ livelihoods with the expectation that they maintain biologically and economically resilient systems. To balance these external influences and the tradeoffs within a grassland system it involves the consideration of interactions between grassland ecology, technology use, environmental externalities, utilisation by grazing animals for food and fibre production, and the long-term profitability of the farming system. Many of these variables are slow-moving and are trade-offs are most efficiently studied with models. The StageTHREE Sustainable Grasslands Model, which utilizes the core functions and dynamics of more mechanistic tools, has been designed to minimize the skill and data required for parameterisation. It allows the key dynamics of the grassland systems to be incorporated along with the stochasticity of the system, in terms of both the uncertainty of the production and market environment. This enables an investigation into the sustainability and environmental impacts of alternative livestock management practices, so that these can be evaluated in relation to policy options. This paper presents an insight into the integration of herder level bioeconomic modelling for the analysis of grassland policy impacts in Mongolia and China. The research highlights that policy settings that reduce stocking rates can improve the environmental services from grasslands, and in most cases, also improve herder livelihoods and resilience.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the XXIV International Grasslands / XI Rangelands Congress
    Subtitle of host publicationSustainable Use of Grassland and Rangeland Resources for Improved Livelihoods
    Place of PublicationNairobi, Kenya
    PublisherKenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization
    Number of pages4
    Publication statusPublished - 25 Oct 2021
    EventJoint International Grassland and International Rangeland Kenya 2021 Virtual Congress - Virtual
    Duration: 25 Oct 202129 Oct 2021
    https://igandircongress2021.dryfta.com/program/140-october-25th-2021-day-1 (Conference program)
    https://uknowledge.uky.edu/igc/24/ (Proceedings)

    Conference

    ConferenceJoint International Grassland and International Rangeland Kenya 2021 Virtual Congress
    Abbreviated titleSustainable use of grassland and rangeland resources for improved livelihoods
    Period25/10/2129/10/21
    OtherJoint XXIV IGC and XI IRC congress will be held in Nairobi, Kenya, October 25 – 29, 2021. The theme of the Congress is "Sustainable Use of Grassland and Rangeland Resources for Improved Livelihoods'. The aim of the congress will be to promote the interchange of scientific and technical information on all aspects of grasslands and rangelands: including grassland and rangeland ecology; forage production and utilization; livestock production systems; wildlife, tourism and multi-facets of grassland and rangeland; drought management and climate change in rangelands; pastoralism, social, gender and policy issues and capacity building, extension and governance.

    The International Grassland Congress promotes interchange of information on all aspects of natural and cultivated grasslands and forage crops for the benefit of mankind, including sustained development, food production and the maintenance of biodiversity.

    The aim of the International Rangeland Congress is to promote the interchange of scientific and technical information on all aspects of rangelands: research, planning, development, management, extension, education and training.
    Internet address

    Grant Number

    • ADP/2012/107

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