Molecular methods to detect and quantify botryosphaeriaceae inocula Associated with Grapevine Dieback in Australia

Regina Baaijens, Jose Ramon Urbez-Torres, Meifang Liu, Matthew Ayres, Mark Sosnowski, Sandra Savocchia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Botryosphaeria dieback, caused by species of Botryosphaeriaceae is an important grapevine trunk disease in Australia. Inocula produced by the pathogens are primarily dispersed by rain splash and wind and infect pruning wounds leading to cankers, dieback and eventually death of vines. The objective of this study was to develop molecular tools to detect and quantify Botryosphaeriaceae inocula from the environment. These tools are essential for investigating
spore dispersal patterns of Botryosphaeriaceae pathogens in Australian vineyards. DNA extraction protocols were evaluated and one modified protocol was found suitable for extracting Botryosphaeriaceae DNA from artificially inoculated and naturally inoculated Burkard volumetric spore sampler tapes. Multi-species primers and a hydrolysis probe for quantitative PCR (qPCR) were further developed to detect and quantify Botryosphaeriaceae inocula from environmental samples. Specificity tests showed that the multi-species primers were able to amplify the DNA of 10 Botryosphaeriaceae species (58 isolates) found in Australia while none of the 27 non-target fungal species (90 isolates) tested were amplified. The qPCR assay was suitable for amplifying purified DNA, synthetic DNA fragments (gBlocks®) and mixed DNA from spore trap tapes. The qPCR method developed in this study was shown to be rapid and sensitive in detecting Botryosphaeriaceae inocula from the environment using spore traps.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1489-1499
Number of pages11
JournalPlant Disease
Volume102
Issue number8
Early online dateFeb 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018

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