Multilingualism and speech-language competence in early childhood

Impact on academic and social-emotional outcomes at school

Sharynne McLeod, Linda Harrison, Chrystal Whiteford, Sue Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This large-scale longitudinal population study provided a rare opportunity to consider the interface between multilingualism and speech-language competence on children's academic and social-emotional outcomes and to determine whether differences between groups at 4-5 years persist, deepen, or disappear with time and schooling. Four distinct groups were identified from the Kindergarten cohort of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) (1) English-only + typical speech and language (n= 2012); (2) multilingual + typical speech and language (n= 476); (3) English-only + speech and language concern (n= 643); and (4) multilingual + speech and language concern (n= 109). Two analytic approaches were used to compare these groups. First, a matched case-control design was used to randomly match multilingual children with speech and language concern (group 4, n= 109) to children in groups 1-3 on gender, age, and family socio-economic position in a cross-sectional comparison of vocabulary, school readiness, and behavioral adjustment. Next, analyses were applied to the whole sample to determine longitudinal effects of group membership on teachers' ratings of literacy, numeracy, and behavioral adjustment at ages 6-7 and 8-9 years. At 4-5 years, multilingual children with speech and language concern did equally well or better than English-only children (with or without speech and language concern) on school readiness tests but performed more poorly on measures of English vocabulary and behavior. At ages 6-7 and 8-9, the early gap between English-only and multilingual children had closed. Multilingualism was not found to contribute to differences in literacy and numeracy outcomes at school; instead, outcomes were more related to concerns about children's speech and language in early childhood. There were no group differences for socio-emotional outcomes. Early evidence for the combined risks of multilingualism plus speech and language concern was not upheld into the scho
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-66
Number of pages14
JournalEarly Childhood Research Quarterly
Volume34
Issue number1
Early online date2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Multilingualism
multilingualism
Mental Competency
Language
childhood
language
school
Social Adjustment
school readiness
Group
Vocabulary
Longitudinal Studies
vocabulary
literacy
Child Language
only child
teacher rating
kindergarten
group membership
longitudinal study

Cite this

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title = "Multilingualism and speech-language competence in early childhood: Impact on academic and social-emotional outcomes at school",
abstract = "This large-scale longitudinal population study provided a rare opportunity to consider the interface between multilingualism and speech-language competence on children's academic and social-emotional outcomes and to determine whether differences between groups at 4-5 years persist, deepen, or disappear with time and schooling. Four distinct groups were identified from the Kindergarten cohort of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) (1) English-only + typical speech and language (n= 2012); (2) multilingual + typical speech and language (n= 476); (3) English-only + speech and language concern (n= 643); and (4) multilingual + speech and language concern (n= 109). Two analytic approaches were used to compare these groups. First, a matched case-control design was used to randomly match multilingual children with speech and language concern (group 4, n= 109) to children in groups 1-3 on gender, age, and family socio-economic position in a cross-sectional comparison of vocabulary, school readiness, and behavioral adjustment. Next, analyses were applied to the whole sample to determine longitudinal effects of group membership on teachers' ratings of literacy, numeracy, and behavioral adjustment at ages 6-7 and 8-9 years. At 4-5 years, multilingual children with speech and language concern did equally well or better than English-only children (with or without speech and language concern) on school readiness tests but performed more poorly on measures of English vocabulary and behavior. At ages 6-7 and 8-9, the early gap between English-only and multilingual children had closed. Multilingualism was not found to contribute to differences in literacy and numeracy outcomes at school; instead, outcomes were more related to concerns about children's speech and language in early childhood. There were no group differences for socio-emotional outcomes. Early evidence for the combined risks of multilingualism plus speech and language concern was not upheld into the scho",
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AU - Harrison, Linda

AU - Whiteford, Chrystal

AU - Walker, Sue

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N2 - This large-scale longitudinal population study provided a rare opportunity to consider the interface between multilingualism and speech-language competence on children's academic and social-emotional outcomes and to determine whether differences between groups at 4-5 years persist, deepen, or disappear with time and schooling. Four distinct groups were identified from the Kindergarten cohort of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) (1) English-only + typical speech and language (n= 2012); (2) multilingual + typical speech and language (n= 476); (3) English-only + speech and language concern (n= 643); and (4) multilingual + speech and language concern (n= 109). Two analytic approaches were used to compare these groups. First, a matched case-control design was used to randomly match multilingual children with speech and language concern (group 4, n= 109) to children in groups 1-3 on gender, age, and family socio-economic position in a cross-sectional comparison of vocabulary, school readiness, and behavioral adjustment. Next, analyses were applied to the whole sample to determine longitudinal effects of group membership on teachers' ratings of literacy, numeracy, and behavioral adjustment at ages 6-7 and 8-9 years. At 4-5 years, multilingual children with speech and language concern did equally well or better than English-only children (with or without speech and language concern) on school readiness tests but performed more poorly on measures of English vocabulary and behavior. At ages 6-7 and 8-9, the early gap between English-only and multilingual children had closed. Multilingualism was not found to contribute to differences in literacy and numeracy outcomes at school; instead, outcomes were more related to concerns about children's speech and language in early childhood. There were no group differences for socio-emotional outcomes. Early evidence for the combined risks of multilingualism plus speech and language concern was not upheld into the scho

AB - This large-scale longitudinal population study provided a rare opportunity to consider the interface between multilingualism and speech-language competence on children's academic and social-emotional outcomes and to determine whether differences between groups at 4-5 years persist, deepen, or disappear with time and schooling. Four distinct groups were identified from the Kindergarten cohort of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children (LSAC) (1) English-only + typical speech and language (n= 2012); (2) multilingual + typical speech and language (n= 476); (3) English-only + speech and language concern (n= 643); and (4) multilingual + speech and language concern (n= 109). Two analytic approaches were used to compare these groups. First, a matched case-control design was used to randomly match multilingual children with speech and language concern (group 4, n= 109) to children in groups 1-3 on gender, age, and family socio-economic position in a cross-sectional comparison of vocabulary, school readiness, and behavioral adjustment. Next, analyses were applied to the whole sample to determine longitudinal effects of group membership on teachers' ratings of literacy, numeracy, and behavioral adjustment at ages 6-7 and 8-9 years. At 4-5 years, multilingual children with speech and language concern did equally well or better than English-only children (with or without speech and language concern) on school readiness tests but performed more poorly on measures of English vocabulary and behavior. At ages 6-7 and 8-9, the early gap between English-only and multilingual children had closed. Multilingualism was not found to contribute to differences in literacy and numeracy outcomes at school; instead, outcomes were more related to concerns about children's speech and language in early childhood. There were no group differences for socio-emotional outcomes. Early evidence for the combined risks of multilingualism plus speech and language concern was not upheld into the scho

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KW - Mathematics

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KW - Numeracy

KW - Reading

KW - Social-emotional outcomes

KW - Speech

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SN - 0885-2006

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