Narrative self-constitution and recovery from addiction

Douglas McConnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Why do some addicted people chronically fail in their goal to recover, while others succeed? On one established view, recovery depends, in part, on efforts of intentional planning agency. This seems right, however, firsthand accounts of addiction suggest that the agent’s self-narrative also has an influence. This paper presents arguments for the view that self-narratives have independent, self- fulfilling momentum that can support or undermine self-governance. The self-narrative structures of addicted persons can entrench addiction and alienate the agent from practically feasible recovery plans. Strategic re-narration can redirect narrative momentum and therefore support recovery in ways that intentional planning alone cannot.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-322
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Philosophical Quarterly
Volume53
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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Recovery
Addiction
Constitution
Narrative Self
Planning
Person
Narrative Structure
Narration
Governance

Cite this

McConnell, Douglas. / Narrative self-constitution and recovery from addiction. In: American Philosophical Quarterly. 2016 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 307-322.
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Narrative self-constitution and recovery from addiction. / McConnell, Douglas.

In: American Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 53, No. 3, 2016, p. 307-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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