Navigating neoliberalism: Schools' funding and the 2007 election

Ian Hardy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    This paper seeks to reveal how neoliberal pressures, and attendant managerial strategies, influenced the politics surrounding the schools' funding debate during the 2007 Australian federal election. In particular, the paper argues that the schools' funding policies of the two major Australian political parties, and political commentators' responses to these policies, were strongly influenced by a general push for continued privatisation within the public sector, and support for conservative economic management. This was evident in how politicians from both major parties were pressured to be supportive of private schooling in a bid to cater to 'aspirational' voters, and the framing of educational spending as proof of fiscal conservatism. However, the paper also reveals some evidence of more social democratic responses to neoliberal and managerial pressures, revealing that the latter have not gone uncontested. Mention is also made of the complex and convoluted politics which attend schools' funding policies, and educational issues in general.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)23-27
    Number of pages5
    JournalSocial Alternatives
    Volume27
    Issue number2
    Publication statusPublished - 2008

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    neoliberalism
    funding policy
    election
    funding
    school
    politics
    public support
    conservatism
    privatization
    politician
    public sector
    management
    evidence
    economics

    Cite this

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    Navigating neoliberalism : Schools' funding and the 2007 election. / Hardy, Ian.

    In: Social Alternatives, Vol. 27, No. 2, 2008, p. 23-27.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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