Neighbourhood Watch for the Facebook generation: The impact of the NSW Wales Police Force's Project Eyewatch strategy on public confidence in policing

Andrew Kelly

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

The dissertation was written through the epistemological lens of objectivism, with a scientific-positivist theoretical framework and the use of quantitative methods of analysis. The study considers whether Project Eyewatch is an effective strategy for enhancing public confidence in the police and, if so, to what degree. The study hypothesises that the use of Facebook by the NSW Police Force contributes to building mutually-beneficial relationships with local communities and engenders confidence and trust in local police. By applying deductive logic, the study shows that if the characteristics of enhanced trust and confidence are present in Project Eyewatch communication, it follows that the hypothesis is true and Project Eyewatch is an effective strategy for enhancing public trust and confidence in the police. These characteristics were drawn from survey questionnaires of major studies of public trust and confidence and then applied to the coding and analysis of this research project. The data was then analysed from both the perfect world (positivist) reality and the real world (normative) reality using a sample of 10 Project Eyewatch Facebook sites as a case study.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationHonours
Awarding Institution
  • Charles Sturt University
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Finlayson, Amalie, Advisor
  • Denyer-Simmons, Peter, Advisor
  • Fell, Bruce, Advisor
  • Pickersgill, Richard, Advisor
Place of PublicationAustralia
Publisher
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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