Neuroethics and psychiatry

Neil Levy, Stephen Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)
9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The field of neuroethics is experiencing a great deal of activity at present, as researchers come to realize the potentially dramatic implications of new work in neuroscience and its applications. This review aims to describe some of the work of direct relevance to psychiatric ethics. The review focuses on ethical issues surrounding the use of propranolol to treat or prevent posttraumatic stress disorder, issues concerning the capacity of the mentally ill to give informed consent to medical treatment and the potential social implications of cognitive enhancers and other interventions into the mind. It is argued that psychiatric ethics would benefit from a consideration of cognate questions arising in neuroethics; in particular, neuroethics has the potential to remind psychiatrists that individual treatment decisions can have broad social implications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)568-571
Number of pages4
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychiatry
Volume21
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2008

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Ethics
Psychiatry
Nootropic Agents
Mentally Ill Persons
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Neurosciences
Informed Consent
Propranolol
Research Personnel
Therapeutics

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Levy, Neil ; Clarke, Stephen. / Neuroethics and psychiatry. In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 568-571.
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Neuroethics and psychiatry. / Levy, Neil; Clarke, Stephen.

In: Current Opinion in Psychiatry, Vol. 21, No. 6, 11.2008, p. 568-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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