Nitrate leaching stimulates subsurface root growth of wheat and increases rhizosphere alkalisation in a highly acidic soil

C. Weligama, P.W.G. Sale, Mark Conyers, De Liu, C. Tang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Subsurface acidity is a major factor limiting crop yield in some agricultural soils. The surface application of lime has limited effect on the subsurface acidity due to the slow downward movement, while deep incorporation of lime is costly. This paper tested the concept of biologically ameliorating subsurface acidity in a highly acidic soil through the net uptake of anions by plant roots. Nitrogen was supplied to the top soil (0'10 cm) as Ca(NO3)2 at rates equivalent to 30' 240 kg N ha'1. Four water levels were imposed (40, 60, 80 and 100% of field capacity). Aluminiumtolerant wheat was grown for 58 days. The high N and high water treatments stimulated root growth below 15 cm, which in turn increased N capture, resulting in a greater excess anion uptake over cations and thus alkalisation of subsurface soil layers. This study suggests that it is feasible to exploit the process of nitrate uptake by an aluminium-tolerant wheat genotype to increase pH in acidic subsoil.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-132
Number of pages14
JournalPlant and Soil
Volume328
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

alkalinization
acid soils
acidity
rhizosphere
root growth
leaching
wheat
nitrates
nitrate
uptake mechanisms
anions
lime
anion
subsurface soil layers
soil
field capacity
water treatment
subsoil
agricultural soils
agricultural soil

Cite this

Weligama, C. ; Sale, P.W.G. ; Conyers, Mark ; Liu, De ; Tang, C. / Nitrate leaching stimulates subsurface root growth of wheat and increases rhizosphere alkalisation in a highly acidic soil. In: Plant and Soil. 2010 ; Vol. 328, No. 1-2. pp. 119-132.
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Nitrate leaching stimulates subsurface root growth of wheat and increases rhizosphere alkalisation in a highly acidic soil. / Weligama, C.; Sale, P.W.G.; Conyers, Mark; Liu, De; Tang, C.

In: Plant and Soil, Vol. 328, No. 1-2, 2010, p. 119-132.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Subsurface acidity is a major factor limiting crop yield in some agricultural soils. The surface application of lime has limited effect on the subsurface acidity due to the slow downward movement, while deep incorporation of lime is costly. This paper tested the concept of biologically ameliorating subsurface acidity in a highly acidic soil through the net uptake of anions by plant roots. Nitrogen was supplied to the top soil (0'10 cm) as Ca(NO3)2 at rates equivalent to 30' 240 kg N ha'1. Four water levels were imposed (40, 60, 80 and 100% of field capacity). Aluminiumtolerant wheat was grown for 58 days. The high N and high water treatments stimulated root growth below 15 cm, which in turn increased N capture, resulting in a greater excess anion uptake over cations and thus alkalisation of subsurface soil layers. This study suggests that it is feasible to exploit the process of nitrate uptake by an aluminium-tolerant wheat genotype to increase pH in acidic subsoil.

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DO - 10.1007/s11104-009-0087-x

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