Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in 'Shiraz' grapevines

Suzy Rogiers, Simon Clarke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and aims: Daytime root-zone temperature may be a significant factor regulating water flux through plants. Water flux can also occur during the night but nocturnal stomatal response to environmental drivers such as root-zone temperature remains largely unknown. Methods: Here we quantified nocturnal and daytime leaf gas exchange in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) exposed to three root-zone temperatures from budburst to fruit set, for a total of eight weeks in spring. Key results: Despite lower stomatal density, night-time stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were greater for plants grown in warm root-zones. Elevated root-zone temperature resulted in higher daytime stomatal conductance, transpiration and net assimilation rates across a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficits, air temperatures and light levels. Intrinsic water use efficiency was, however, lowest in those plants with warm root-zones. CO2 response curves of foliar gas exchange indicated that the maximum rate of electron transport and the maximum rate of Rubisco activity did not differ between the root-zone treatments, therefore it was likely that the lower photosynthesis in cool root-zones was predominantly the result of a stomatal limitation. One week after the discontinuation of the temperature treatments, gas exchange was similar between the plants, indicating a reversible physiological response to soil temperature. Conclusions: In this anisohydric grapevine variety both night-time and daytime stomatal conductance were responsive to root-zone temperature. Because nocturnal transpiration has implications for overall plant water status, predictive climate change models using stomatal conductance will need to factor in this root-zone variable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)433-444
Number of pages12
JournalAnnals of Botany
Volume111
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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root zone temperature
stomatal conductance
rhizosphere
gas exchange
transpiration
net assimilation rate
water
ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase
vapor pressure
fruit set
Vitis vinifera
electron transfer
soil temperature
water use efficiency
plant response
leaves
air temperature
carbon dioxide
climate change
photosynthesis

Cite this

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title = "Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in 'Shiraz' grapevines",
abstract = "Background and aims: Daytime root-zone temperature may be a significant factor regulating water flux through plants. Water flux can also occur during the night but nocturnal stomatal response to environmental drivers such as root-zone temperature remains largely unknown. Methods: Here we quantified nocturnal and daytime leaf gas exchange in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) exposed to three root-zone temperatures from budburst to fruit set, for a total of eight weeks in spring. Key results: Despite lower stomatal density, night-time stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were greater for plants grown in warm root-zones. Elevated root-zone temperature resulted in higher daytime stomatal conductance, transpiration and net assimilation rates across a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficits, air temperatures and light levels. Intrinsic water use efficiency was, however, lowest in those plants with warm root-zones. CO2 response curves of foliar gas exchange indicated that the maximum rate of electron transport and the maximum rate of Rubisco activity did not differ between the root-zone treatments, therefore it was likely that the lower photosynthesis in cool root-zones was predominantly the result of a stomatal limitation. One week after the discontinuation of the temperature treatments, gas exchange was similar between the plants, indicating a reversible physiological response to soil temperature. Conclusions: In this anisohydric grapevine variety both night-time and daytime stomatal conductance were responsive to root-zone temperature. Because nocturnal transpiration has implications for overall plant water status, predictive climate change models using stomatal conductance will need to factor in this root-zone variable.",
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Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in 'Shiraz' grapevines. / Rogiers, Suzy; Clarke, Simon.

In: Annals of Botany, Vol. 111, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 433-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nocturnal and daytime stomatal conductance respond to root-zone temperature in 'Shiraz' grapevines

AU - Rogiers, Suzy

AU - Clarke, Simon

N1 - Imported on 12 Apr 2017 - DigiTool details were: month (773h) = March, 2013; Journal title (773t) = Annals of Botany. ISSNs: 0305-7364;

PY - 2013/3

Y1 - 2013/3

N2 - Background and aims: Daytime root-zone temperature may be a significant factor regulating water flux through plants. Water flux can also occur during the night but nocturnal stomatal response to environmental drivers such as root-zone temperature remains largely unknown. Methods: Here we quantified nocturnal and daytime leaf gas exchange in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) exposed to three root-zone temperatures from budburst to fruit set, for a total of eight weeks in spring. Key results: Despite lower stomatal density, night-time stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were greater for plants grown in warm root-zones. Elevated root-zone temperature resulted in higher daytime stomatal conductance, transpiration and net assimilation rates across a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficits, air temperatures and light levels. Intrinsic water use efficiency was, however, lowest in those plants with warm root-zones. CO2 response curves of foliar gas exchange indicated that the maximum rate of electron transport and the maximum rate of Rubisco activity did not differ between the root-zone treatments, therefore it was likely that the lower photosynthesis in cool root-zones was predominantly the result of a stomatal limitation. One week after the discontinuation of the temperature treatments, gas exchange was similar between the plants, indicating a reversible physiological response to soil temperature. Conclusions: In this anisohydric grapevine variety both night-time and daytime stomatal conductance were responsive to root-zone temperature. Because nocturnal transpiration has implications for overall plant water status, predictive climate change models using stomatal conductance will need to factor in this root-zone variable.

AB - Background and aims: Daytime root-zone temperature may be a significant factor regulating water flux through plants. Water flux can also occur during the night but nocturnal stomatal response to environmental drivers such as root-zone temperature remains largely unknown. Methods: Here we quantified nocturnal and daytime leaf gas exchange in Shiraz grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) exposed to three root-zone temperatures from budburst to fruit set, for a total of eight weeks in spring. Key results: Despite lower stomatal density, night-time stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were greater for plants grown in warm root-zones. Elevated root-zone temperature resulted in higher daytime stomatal conductance, transpiration and net assimilation rates across a range of leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficits, air temperatures and light levels. Intrinsic water use efficiency was, however, lowest in those plants with warm root-zones. CO2 response curves of foliar gas exchange indicated that the maximum rate of electron transport and the maximum rate of Rubisco activity did not differ between the root-zone treatments, therefore it was likely that the lower photosynthesis in cool root-zones was predominantly the result of a stomatal limitation. One week after the discontinuation of the temperature treatments, gas exchange was similar between the plants, indicating a reversible physiological response to soil temperature. Conclusions: In this anisohydric grapevine variety both night-time and daytime stomatal conductance were responsive to root-zone temperature. Because nocturnal transpiration has implications for overall plant water status, predictive climate change models using stomatal conductance will need to factor in this root-zone variable.

KW - CO2 assimilation

KW - Leaf gas exchange

KW - Vitis vinifera

KW - Water-use efficiency

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JO - Annals of Botany

JF - Annals of Botany

SN - 0305-7364

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