Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

Abstract

Environmental conservation is intimately tied to both economic development and sustainable management of natural resources. Convergence and complementarities of environmental and developmental functions of forest management and their sustainable utilization is a challenge for both developing and industrialized countries. While each nation may see forests as a consumable commodity, at an international level forests are scarce resources and their non-commodity values matter particularly with respect to climate change mitigation and bio-diversity conservation. This chapter therefore reviews and discusses the issue of non-forest sector (external) policies that affect forestry sector and the environment. The analysis highlights the importance and complexity of policy linkages between the forestry sector and other socio-economic sectors on sustainable forest development. Policy interaction seems particularly important for macroeconomic and land-use policies. The chapter also analyses the efforts taken by the international community for the conservation and management of forests with respect to markets for CO2 emission and the debt-for-nature swap. It appears that the incentives for these markets are still at the infant stage because of the high transaction costs involved. Lastly, an analysis of policy options and the instruments used for the conservation of bio-diversity resources in developing countries are reviewed. Creation of Global Environmental Facility (GEF) seems to be a significant effort in conserving (forest-based) biodiversity, and it could provide cost-effective benefits to the global environment.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationDeforestation Research Progress
EditorsPeter Sullivan, Ilya B Sanchez
Place of PublicationNew York, USA
PublisherNova Science Publishers
Pages127-139
Number of pages13
Edition8
ISBN (Print)9781604566765
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

deforestation
market
biodiversity
debt for nature swap
forestry
transaction cost
complementarity
resource
macroeconomics
commodity
forest management
incentive
economic development
developing world
policy
land use
cost
analysis

Cite this

Culas, R. (2008). Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process. In P. Sullivan, & I. B. Sanchez (Eds.), Deforestation Research Progress (8 ed., pp. 127-139). New York, USA: Nova Science Publishers.
Culas, Richard. / Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process. Deforestation Research Progress. editor / Peter Sullivan ; Ilya B Sanchez. 8. ed. New York, USA : Nova Science Publishers, 2008. pp. 127-139
@inbook{d0cdf175ee86457eb56b139ef8b8ceb0,
title = "Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process",
abstract = "Environmental conservation is intimately tied to both economic development and sustainable management of natural resources. Convergence and complementarities of environmental and developmental functions of forest management and their sustainable utilization is a challenge for both developing and industrialized countries. While each nation may see forests as a consumable commodity, at an international level forests are scarce resources and their non-commodity values matter particularly with respect to climate change mitigation and bio-diversity conservation. This chapter therefore reviews and discusses the issue of non-forest sector (external) policies that affect forestry sector and the environment. The analysis highlights the importance and complexity of policy linkages between the forestry sector and other socio-economic sectors on sustainable forest development. Policy interaction seems particularly important for macroeconomic and land-use policies. The chapter also analyses the efforts taken by the international community for the conservation and management of forests with respect to markets for CO2 emission and the debt-for-nature swap. It appears that the incentives for these markets are still at the infant stage because of the high transaction costs involved. Lastly, an analysis of policy options and the instruments used for the conservation of bio-diversity resources in developing countries are reviewed. Creation of Global Environmental Facility (GEF) seems to be a significant effort in conserving (forest-based) biodiversity, and it could provide cost-effective benefits to the global environment.",
keywords = "Bio-diversity conservation, Deforestation, Global Environmental Facility (GEF), Global environmental markets, Non-forest sector policies",
author = "Richard Culas",
note = "Imported on 12 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = New York, USA: Nova Science Publishers, 2008. editor/s (773b) = Ilya B Sanchez and Carl L Alonso,; Issue no. (773s) = 8; Parent title (773t) = Deforestation Research Progress; No. of chapters (773w) = 14.",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781604566765",
pages = "127--139",
editor = "Peter Sullivan and Sanchez, {Ilya B}",
booktitle = "Deforestation Research Progress",
publisher = "Nova Science Publishers",
address = "United States",
edition = "8",

}

Culas, R 2008, Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process. in P Sullivan & IB Sanchez (eds), Deforestation Research Progress. 8 edn, Nova Science Publishers, New York, USA, pp. 127-139.

Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process. / Culas, Richard.

Deforestation Research Progress. ed. / Peter Sullivan; Ilya B Sanchez. 8. ed. New York, USA : Nova Science Publishers, 2008. p. 127-139.

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperChapter (peer-reviewed)

TY - CHAP

T1 - Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process

AU - Culas, Richard

N1 - Imported on 12 May 2017 - DigiTool details were: publisher = New York, USA: Nova Science Publishers, 2008. editor/s (773b) = Ilya B Sanchez and Carl L Alonso,; Issue no. (773s) = 8; Parent title (773t) = Deforestation Research Progress; No. of chapters (773w) = 14.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Environmental conservation is intimately tied to both economic development and sustainable management of natural resources. Convergence and complementarities of environmental and developmental functions of forest management and their sustainable utilization is a challenge for both developing and industrialized countries. While each nation may see forests as a consumable commodity, at an international level forests are scarce resources and their non-commodity values matter particularly with respect to climate change mitigation and bio-diversity conservation. This chapter therefore reviews and discusses the issue of non-forest sector (external) policies that affect forestry sector and the environment. The analysis highlights the importance and complexity of policy linkages between the forestry sector and other socio-economic sectors on sustainable forest development. Policy interaction seems particularly important for macroeconomic and land-use policies. The chapter also analyses the efforts taken by the international community for the conservation and management of forests with respect to markets for CO2 emission and the debt-for-nature swap. It appears that the incentives for these markets are still at the infant stage because of the high transaction costs involved. Lastly, an analysis of policy options and the instruments used for the conservation of bio-diversity resources in developing countries are reviewed. Creation of Global Environmental Facility (GEF) seems to be a significant effort in conserving (forest-based) biodiversity, and it could provide cost-effective benefits to the global environment.

AB - Environmental conservation is intimately tied to both economic development and sustainable management of natural resources. Convergence and complementarities of environmental and developmental functions of forest management and their sustainable utilization is a challenge for both developing and industrialized countries. While each nation may see forests as a consumable commodity, at an international level forests are scarce resources and their non-commodity values matter particularly with respect to climate change mitigation and bio-diversity conservation. This chapter therefore reviews and discusses the issue of non-forest sector (external) policies that affect forestry sector and the environment. The analysis highlights the importance and complexity of policy linkages between the forestry sector and other socio-economic sectors on sustainable forest development. Policy interaction seems particularly important for macroeconomic and land-use policies. The chapter also analyses the efforts taken by the international community for the conservation and management of forests with respect to markets for CO2 emission and the debt-for-nature swap. It appears that the incentives for these markets are still at the infant stage because of the high transaction costs involved. Lastly, an analysis of policy options and the instruments used for the conservation of bio-diversity resources in developing countries are reviewed. Creation of Global Environmental Facility (GEF) seems to be a significant effort in conserving (forest-based) biodiversity, and it could provide cost-effective benefits to the global environment.

KW - Bio-diversity conservation

KW - Deforestation

KW - Global Environmental Facility (GEF)

KW - Global environmental markets

KW - Non-forest sector policies

M3 - Chapter (peer-reviewed)

SN - 9781604566765

SP - 127

EP - 139

BT - Deforestation Research Progress

A2 - Sullivan, Peter

A2 - Sanchez, Ilya B

PB - Nova Science Publishers

CY - New York, USA

ER -

Culas R. Non Forest Sector Policies, Global Environmental Markets, and the Deforestation Process. In Sullivan P, Sanchez IB, editors, Deforestation Research Progress. 8 ed. New York, USA: Nova Science Publishers. 2008. p. 127-139