Observations on the consumption and dispersal of Phoenix canariensis drupes by the Grey-headed flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
73 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aided by their transplantability as adult plants, Phoenix canariensis and Washingtonia robusta palms have a long history as ornamental feature trees in urban settings. With their plentiful production of carbo-hydrate reach drupes, palms have become a major food source for the grey-headed flying-fox (Pteropus poliocephalus) during late autumn and early winter. This paper reviews the consumption of Phoenix canariensis and Washingtonia robusta drupes based on the field observations and a morphological and metric analysis of spat-out remains ('ejecta'). Based on a review of the mastication mechanics of fruit consumption, the paper demonstrates that P. poliocephalus can be ruled out as a disperser of the invasive Phoenix canariensis, but must be considered for the dispersal of Washingtonia robusta.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-49
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Ecology
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jan 2018

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Observations on the consumption and dispersal of <i>Phoenix canariensis</i> drupes by the Grey-headed flying-fox (<i>Pteropus poliocephalus</i>)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this