On evolutionary processes in natural and artificial systems

David Green, David Newth, David Cornforth, Michael Kirley

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

The close links that now exist between biology and computation raise the prospect of setting species evolution in a broader, computational context. This context would comprise theories about the origins of pattern and order in complex systems. We argue that several processes play crucial roles in both natural and artificial evolution. One mechanism consists of critical changes between different system phases that promote order and variation respectively. Processes that lead to modular structures promote both robustness and increasing complexity in evolution. Examples of such processes include genetic convergence, gene shuffling and ordered asynchronous processing. We demonstrate that gene shuffling causes colocation of genes on chromosomes, thus promoting genetic modularity.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication5th Australasia-Japan Joint Workshop on Intelligent and Evolutionary Systems
EditorsP. Whigham, M. Gen, K. Richards, Y. Tujimura, B. McKay, A. Namatame
Place of PublicationDunedin, New Zealand
PublisherUniversity of Otago
Pages1-10
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)0731705033
Publication statusPublished - 2001
EventAustralasia-Japan Joint Workshop on Intelligent and Evolutionary Systems - Dunedin, New Zealand, New Zealand
Duration: 19 Nov 200121 Nov 2001

Workshop

WorkshopAustralasia-Japan Joint Workshop on Intelligent and Evolutionary Systems
CountryNew Zealand
Period19/11/0121/11/01

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    Green, D., Newth, D., Cornforth, D., & Kirley, M. (2001). On evolutionary processes in natural and artificial systems. In P. Whigham, M. Gen, K. Richards, Y. Tujimura, B. McKay, & A. Namatame (Eds.), 5th Australasia-Japan Joint Workshop on Intelligent and Evolutionary Systems (pp. 1-10). University of Otago.