Opportunity to increase phosphorus efficiency through co-application of organic amendments with mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP)

David Gale, Jason Condon, Mark Conyers, Alison Southwell

Research output: Book chapter/Published conference paperConference paper

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Abstract

As the world's population continues to increase towards the predicted 2050 figure of 9 billion (Fischer et al., 2002) so too does the demand for food. Until the early 1950s, world agricultural production kept pace with population mainly through the expansion of cultivated area and increasing crop yields (i.e. production per unit area) (Gilland, 1993). This was achieved through breeding improvements, expanding and improving irrigation systems, and protecting crops from disease, insects, and competition from weeds, as well as applying increasing quantities of chemical fertilisers (Gilland, 1993). However, the sustainability of the required agricultural production is in question if the raw inputs of many fertilisers, such as those supplying phosphorus (P), are finite, and if fertiliser costs continue to increase such that production profitability is lost (Cordell et al., 2009). Therefore, alternative, or simply more efficient, sources of nutrition are required. The efficacy of single and combined applications of compost and synthetic fertiliser were compared in a glasshouse trial to determine the potential for reduction in synthetic fertiliser usage through partial substitution with compost. A microbial inoculant alone and in combination with compost or synthetic fertiliser was also included in the comparison undertaken. This project tests the hypothesis that conventional synthetic, and organic, fertilisers could be used together to maintain or increase yield, whilst reducing demands on conventional, mined, synthetic P supplies through greater fertiliser efficiency
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 5th WCCA, incorporating the 3rd FSDC
Subtitle of host publicationResilient Food Systems for a Changing World
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherAPAARI
Pages1-5
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event5th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, incorporating 3rd Farming Systems Design Conference - Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre, and University of Queensland, Gatton Campus, Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 26 Sep 201129 Sep 2011
https://web.archive.org/web/20111025020201/http://www.wcca2011.org/index.htm (Conference website)

Conference

Conference5th World Congress on Conservation Agriculture, incorporating 3rd Farming Systems Design Conference
Abbreviated titleResilient food systems for a changing world
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period26/09/1129/09/11
OtherAustralia, host for the 5th WCCA and 3rd FSD, welcomes scientists and practitioners to Brisbane to discuss current and future developments of sustainable agriculture next year.

The co-location of WCCA and FSD provides a great opportunity to explore the application of conservation agriculture practices and principles in a systems context. The common objective is the design of more productive, economic, and sustainable farming systems to meet the challenges of expanding population, global change, and environmental degradation.
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    Gale, D., Condon, J., Conyers, M., & Southwell, A. (2011). Opportunity to increase phosphorus efficiency through co-application of organic amendments with mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP). In Proceedings of the 5th WCCA, incorporating the 3rd FSDC: Resilient Food Systems for a Changing World (pp. 1-5). APAARI.