Optimising chemical marking techniques for Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata, fry and fingerlings prior to restocking

Leo M Cameron, Lee Baumgartner, Daniel J. Bucher, Wayne Robinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many stocking programs are performed without any subsequent assessments to determine the survival of thestocked fish, often due to the difficulties in distinguishing stocked from wild fish. A series of optimisation trials wereundertaken to determine the suitability of calcein (2,4-bis-[N,N0'di(carbomethyl)-aminomethyl]fluorescein) for chemicallymarking hatchery-reared Australian bass, Macquaria novemaculeata (Steindachner), fry and fingerlings. The technique wasoptimised by trialling immersion times for salt (2.5 or 5 min), calcein concentrations (0.5 or 1%) and calcein immersion times(5 or 10 min). A general-purpose modulated probe fluorometer was used as a non-lethal detection method to establish markretention and distinguish between calcein-marked and unmarked fish. Five minutes of saline immersion, followed by 10 minof calcein immersion at a calcein concentration of 1% was the optimal marking method. Growth and survival of fish was notaffected as a result of any of the calcein-marking methods. It is therefore effective to calcein-mark Australian bass fry andfingerlings before stocking and to non-lethally detect marked individuals using a field-portable meter to assist in theassessment of stocking programs. Findings from this study may also reflect the potential use of calcein to chemically mark fryand fingerlings of other fish species.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)242-248
Number of pages7
JournalAustralian Journal of Zoology
Volume59
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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